Registration statement for closed-end investment companies


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As filed with the Securities a nd Exchange Commission on June 5, 2014

Securities Act File No. 333-195652

U.S. SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549



FORM N-2



REGISTRATION STATEMENT UNDER THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933 x

(Check appropriate box or boxes)
Pre-Effective Amendment No. 1 x
Post-Effective Amendment No. o



OXFORD LANE CAPITAL CORP.

(Exact name of Registrant as specified in charter)

8 Sound Shore Drive, Suite 255
Greenwich, CT 06830

(Address of Principal Executive Offices)

Registrant’s telephone number, including Area Code: (203) 983-5275

Jonathan H. Cohen
Chief Executive Officer
Oxford Lane Capital Corp.
8 Sound Shore Drive, Suite 255
Greenwich, CT 06830

(Name and address of agent for service)



COPIES TO:

Steven B. Boehm
John J. Mahon
Sutherland Asbill & Brennan LLP
700 Sixth Street, N.W., Suite 700
Washington, DC 20001
(202) 383-0100



Approximate date of proposed public offering: As soon as practicable after the effective date of this Registration Statement.

If any securities being registered on this form will be offered on a delayed or continuous basis in reliance on Rule 415 under the Securities Act of 1933, other than securities offered in connection with a dividend reinvestment plan, check the following box. x

It is proposed that this filing will become effective (check appropriate box):

o when declared effective pursuant to section 8(c).


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CALCULATION OF REGISTRATION FEE UNDER THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933

Title of Securities Being Registered Proposed Maximum
Aggregate
Offering Price (1)
Amount of
Registration Fee (1)
Common Stock, $0.01 par value per share (2) (3)
Preferred Stock, $0.01 par value per share (2)
Subscription Rights (2)
Debt Securities (4)
Total (5) $ 500,000,000 (5) $ 64,400 (6)

(1) Estimated pursuant to Rule 457(o) under the Securities Act of 1933 solely for the purpose of determining the registration fee. The proposed maximum offering price per security will be determined, from time to time, by the Registrant in connection with the sale by the Registrant of the securities registered under this Registration Statement.
(2) Subject to Note 5 below, there is being registered hereunder an indeterminate number of shares of common stock or preferred stock, or subscription rights to purchase shares of common stock as may be sold, from time to time.
(3) Includes such indeterminate number of shares of common stock as may, from time to time, be issued upon conversion or exchange of other securities registered hereunder, to the extent any such securities are, by their terms, convertible or exchangeable for common stock.
(4) Subject to Note 5 below, there is being registered hereunder an indeterminate number of debt securities as may be sold, from time to time. If any debt securities are issued at an original issue discount, then the offering price shall be in such greater principal amount as shall result in an aggregate price to investors not to exceed $500,000,000.
(5) In no event will the aggregate offering price of all securities issued from time to time pursuant to this Registration Statement exceed $500,000,000.
(6) Previously paid.


The Registrant hereby amends this Registration Statement on such date or dates as may be necessary to delay its effective date until the Registrant shall file a further amendment which specifically states that this Registration Statement shall thereafter become effective in accordance with Section 8(a) of the Securities Act of 1933 or until the Registration Statement shall become effective on such date as the Securities and Exchange Commission, acting pursuant to said Section 8(a), may determine.


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The information in this prospectus is not complete and may be changed. We may not sell these securities until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted.

PRELIMINARY PROSPECTUS SUBJECT TO COMPLETION, DATED     , 2014

$500,000,000

[GRAPHIC MISSING]

Oxford Lane Capital Corp.

Common Stock
Preferred Stock
Subscription Rights
Debt Securities



We are a non-diversified, closed-end management investment company that has registered as an investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940, or the “1940 Act.” Our investment objective is to maximize our portfolio’s total return. We have initially implemented our investment objective by purchasing portions of equity and junior debt tranches of collateralized loan obligation (“CLO”) vehicles. Structurally, CLO vehicles are entities formed to originate and manage a portfolio of loans. The loans within the CLO vehicle are limited to loans which meet established credit criteria and are subject to concentration limitations in order to limit a CLO vehicle’s exposure to a single credit.

We may offer, from time to time, in one or more offerings or series, up to $500,000,000 of our common stock, preferred stock, subscription rights to purchase shares of our common stock or debt securities, which we refer to, collectively, as our “securities.” The preferred stock and subscription rights offered hereby may be convertible or exchangeable into shares of our common stock. The securities may be offered at prices and on terms to be described in one or more supplements to this prospectus.

In the event we offer common stock, the offering price per share of our common stock less any underwriting discounts or commissions will generally not be less than the net asset value per share of our common stock at the time we make the offering. However, we may issue shares of our common stock pursuant to this prospectus at a price per share that is less than our net asset value per share (i) in connection with a rights offering to our existing stockholders, (ii) with the prior approval of the majority of our common stockholders or (iii) under such other circumstances as the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) may permit.

Our securities may be offered directly to one or more purchasers, or through agents designated from time to time by us, or to or through underwriters or dealers. Each prospectus supplement relating to an offering will identify any agents or underwriters involved in the sale of our securities, and will disclose any applicable purchase price, fee, discount or commissions arrangement between us and our agents or underwriters or among our underwriters or the basis upon which such amount may be calculated. See “Plan of Distribution.” We may not sell any of our securities through agents, underwriters or dealers without delivery of this prospectus and a prospectus supplement describing the method and terms of the offering of such securities.

Our common stock is traded on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol “OXLC.” On June 4, 2014, the last reported sales price on the NASDAQ Global Select Market for our common stock was $17.68 per share. We are required to determine the net asset value per share of our common stock on a quarterly basis. Our net asset value per share of our common stock as of March 31, 2014 was $16.26.

This prospectus and any accompanying prospectus supplement contains important information about us that a prospective investor should know before investing in our securities. Please read this prospectus and any accompanying prospectus supplement before investing and keep it for future reference. We are required to file annual, semi-annual and quarterly reports, proxy statements and other information about us with the Securities and Exchange Commission, or the “SEC.” This information is available free of charge by contacting us by mail at 8 Sound Shore Drive, Suite 255, Greenwich, CT 06830, by telephone at (203) 983-5275 or on our website at http://www.oxfordlanecapital.com . The SEC also maintains a website at http://www.sec.gov that contains such information. Information contained on our website is not incorporated by reference into this prospectus, and you should not consider that information to be part of this prospectus.



An investment in our securities is subject to risks and involves a heightened risk of total loss of investment. Shares of closed-end investment companies frequently trade at a discount to their net asset value. In addition, the CLO securities in which we invest are subject to special risks. See “Risk Factors” beginning on page 17 to read about factors you should consider, including the risk of leverage, before investing in our securities.

Neither the SEC nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of these securities or determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

This prospectus may not be used to consummate sales of our securities unless accompanied by a prospectus supplement.

The date of this prospectus is           , 2014.


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You should rely on the information contained in this prospectus or any accompanying prospectus supplement. We have not, and the dealer managers have not, authorized any other person to provide you with different information or to make representations as to matters not stated in this prospectus or any accompanying prospectus supplement. If anyone provides you with different or inconsistent information, you should not rely on it. We are offering to sell, and seeking offers to buy, securities only in jurisdictions where offers and sales are permitted. You should not assume that the information contained in this prospectus or any accompanying prospectus supplement is accurate as of any date other than the date on their respective cover pages. This prospectus and any accompanying prospectus supplement will be amended to reflect material changes to the information contained herein and therein.



OXFORD LANE CAPITAL CORP.

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Page
Summary 1
Offerings 9
Fees and Expenses 12
Financial Highlights 15
Risk Factors 17
Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements 36
Use of Proceeds 37
Price Range of Common Stock and Distributions 38
Senior Securities 41
Business 42
Management 50
Portfolio Management 57
Investment Advisory Agreement 60
Administration Agreement 65
Certain Relationships and Transactions 66
Control Persons and Principal Stockholders 67
Regulation as a Registered Closed-End Management Investment Company 69
Determination of Net Asset Value 74
Dividend Reinvestment Plan 76
Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations 77
Description of Securities 85
Description of Our Capital Stock 86
Description of Our Preferred Stock 93
Description of Our Subscription Rights 94
Description of Our Debt Securities 95
Plan of Distribution 108
Custodian, Transfer and Distribution Paying Agent and Registrar 110
Brokerage Allocation and Other Practices 110
Legal Matters 110
Experts 110
Available Information 110
Index to Financial Statements F-1

ABOUT THIS PROSPECTUS

This prospectus is part of a registration statement that we have filed with the SEC, using the “shelf” registration process. Under the shelf registration process, we may offer, from time to time, in one or more offerings up to $500,000,000 of our common stock, preferred stock, subscription rights to purchase shares of our common stock or debt securities, on terms to be determined at the time of the offering. The securities may be offered at prices and on terms described in one or more supplements to this prospectus. This prospectus provides you with a general description of the securities that we may offer. Each time we use this prospectus to offer securities, we will provide a prospectus supplement that will contain specific information about the terms of that offering. The prospectus supplement may also add, update or change information contained in

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this prospectus. If there is any inconsistency between information in this prospectus and any accompanying prospectus supplement, you should rely only on the information contained in the prospectus supplement. Please carefully read this prospectus and the prospectus supplement together with any exhibits and the additional information described under the headings “Available Information” and “Risk Factors” before you make an investment decision.

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SUMMARY

The following summary contains basic information about this offering. It may not contain all the information that is important to an investor. For a more complete understanding of this offering, you should read this entire document and the documents to which we have referred.

Except where the context requires otherwise, the terms “Oxford Lane Capital,” the “Company,” “we,” “us” and “our” refer to Oxford Lane Capital Corp.; “Oxford Lane Management” and “investment adviser” refer to Oxford Lane Management, LLC; and “BDC Partners” refers to BDC Partners, LLC.

Overview

We are a non-diversified closed-end management investment company that has registered as an investment company under the 1940 Act. Our investment objective is to maximize our portfolio’s total return.

We have initially implemented our investment objective by purchasing portions of equity and junior debt tranches of collateralized loan obligation (“CLO”) vehicles. Substantially all of the CLO vehicles in which we may invest would be deemed to be investment companies under the 1940 Act but for the exceptions set forth in section 3(c)(1) or section 3(c)(7). Structurally, CLO vehicles are entities formed to originate and manage a portfolio of loans. The loans within the CLO vehicle are limited to loans which meet established credit criteria and are subject to concentration limitations in order to limit a CLO vehicle’s exposure to a single credit. A CLO vehicle is formed by raising various classes or “tranches” of debt (with the most senior tranches being rated “AAA” to the most junior tranches typically being rated “BB” or “B”) and equity. The CLO vehicles which we focus on are collateralized primarily by senior secured loans made to companies whose debt is unrated or is rated below investment grade (“Senior Loans”), and generally have very little or no exposure to real estate, mortgage loans or to pools of consumer-based debt, such as credit card receivables or auto loans. Our investment strategy also includes warehouse facilities, which are financing structures intended to aggregate loans that may be used to form the basis of a CLO vehicle. We may also invest, on an opportunistic basis, in other corporate credits of a variety of types. We expect that each of our investments will range in size from $5 million to $50 million, although the investment size may vary consistent with the size of our overall portfolio.

Oxford Lane Management manages our investments and its affiliate arranges for the performance of the administrative services necessary for us to operate.

Distributions

In order to qualify as a regulated investment company, or “RIC,” and to eliminate our liability for corporate-level tax on the income we distribute to our stockholders, we are required, under Subchapter M of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or the “Code,” to distribute to our stockholders on an annual basis at least 90% of our ordinary income and realized net short-term capital gains in excess of realized net long-term capital gains, if any.

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The following table reflects the cash distributions, including dividends, dividends reinvested and returns of capital, if any, per share that we have declared on our common stock to date:

Date Declared Record Date Payment Date Amount (1)
Fiscal 2015
May 19, 2014 June 16, 2014 June 30, 2014 $ 0.60
Fiscal 2014
November 26, 2013 March 17, 2014 March 31, 2014 0.60
November 26, 2013 March 17, 2014 March 31, 2014 0.10 (2)
November 6, 2013 December 17, 2013 December 31, 2013 0.55
July 24, 2013 September 16, 2013 September 30, 2013 0.55
May 22, 2013 June 14, 2013 June 28, 2013 0.55
Total (2014) 2.35
Fiscal 2013
February 6, 2013 March 15, 2013 March 29, 2013 0.55
October 23, 2012 December 17, 2012 December 31, 2012 0.55
July 31, 2012 September 14, 2012 September 28, 2012 0.55
May 22, 2012 June 15, 2012 June 29, 2012 0.55
Total (2013) 2.20
Fiscal 2012
January 25, 2012 March 16, 2012 March 30, 2012 0.55
October 24, 2011 December 16, 2011 December 30, 2011 0.50
July 22, 2011 September 16, 2011 September 30, 2011 0.50
April 6, 2011 June 16, 2011 June 30, 2011 0.50
Total (2012) 2.05
Fiscal 2011
March 7, 2011 March 21, 2011 April 1, 2011 0.25
Total (2011) 0.25
$ 7.45

(1) All of our cash distributions to date were funded from net investment income, except approximately $0.07 per share and $0.40 per share of the distributions paid on June 29, 2012 and June 28, 2013, respectively, which were funded from long term capital gains. The tax characterization of cash distributions for the year ended March 31, 2014 will not be known until the tax return for that year is finalized.
(2) Represents a special dividend for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014.

For fiscal year 2014, we paid $1,344,083 and $2,638,151 in preferred dividends on the 8.50% Series 2017 Term Preferred Stock (the “Series 2017 Term Preferred Shares”) and the 7.50% Series 2023 Term Preferred Stock (the “Series 2023 Term Preferred Shares”), respectively. For fiscal year 2013, we paid $459,228 in preferred dividends on the Series 2017 Term Preferred Shares.

For accounting purposes the distributions declared on our common stock for the fiscal periods ended March 31, 2013, 2012 and 2011 were in excess of the reported earnings. However, as a RIC, earnings and distributions are determined on a tax basis. Furthermore, taxable earnings are determined according to tax regulations and differ from reported income for accounting purposes. For the fiscal periods ended March 31, 2013, 2012 and 2011, taxable earnings exceeded our distributions, and there was no tax return of capital for these years. To the extent that taxable earnings for any fiscal year are less than the amount of the dividends paid during the year, there would be a tax return of capital to shareholders. Distributions in excess of current and accumulated taxable earnings and profits will generally not be taxable to the shareholders, because a tax return of capital represents a return of a portion of a shareholder’s original investment in our common stock to the extent of a shareholder’s basis in our stock. Generally, a tax return of capital will reduce an investor’s

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basis in our stock for federal tax purposes, which will result in the shareholder recognizing additional gain (or less loss) when the stock is sold. Assuming that a shareholder holds our stock as a capital asset, any such additional gain would be a capital gain. Shareholders should not assume that the source of all distributions is from our net profits and shareholders may periodically receive the payment of a dividend consisting of a return of capital. The tax character of any distributions will be determined after the end of the fiscal year. Tax matters are very complicated and the tax consequences to an investor of an investment in our shares will depend on the facts of its particular situation. We encourage investors to consult their own tax advisors regarding the specific consequences of such an investment, including tax reporting requirements, the applicability of federal, state, local and foreign tax laws, eligibility for the benefits of any applicable tax treaty and the effect of any possible changes in the tax laws.

Oxford Lane Management

Our investment activities are managed by Oxford Lane Management, which is an investment adviser that has registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940, or the “Advisers Act.” Under our investment advisory agreement with Oxford Lane Management, which we refer to as our “Investment Advisory Agreement,” we have agreed to pay Oxford Lane Management an annual base management fee based on our gross assets, as well as an incentive fee based on our performance. See “Investment Advisory Agreement.”

We expect to benefit from the proven ability of our investment adviser’s team to identify attractive opportunities, conduct diligence on and value prospective investments, negotiate terms where appropriate, and manage and monitor a diversified portfolio although we do not intend to operate as a “diversified” investment company within the meaning of the 1940 Act. Our investment adviser’s senior investment team members have broad investment backgrounds, with prior experience at investment banks, commercial banks, unregistered investment funds and other financial services companies, and have collectively developed a broad network of contacts to provide us with our principal source of investment opportunities.

Our investment adviser is led by Jonathan H. Cohen, our Chief Executive Officer, and Saul B. Rosenthal, our President. Messrs. Cohen and Rosenthal are assisted by Darryl M. Monasebian and Hari Srinivasan, who serve as Executive Vice President and Managing Director for Oxford Lane Management, respectively. We consider Messrs. Cohen, Rosenthal, Monasebian and Srinivasan to be Oxford Lane Management’s senior investment team.

Messrs. Cohen, Rosenthal, Monasebien and Srinivasan together with the other members of Oxford Lane Management’s investment team, have developed an infrastructure that we believe provides Oxford Lane Capital with a competitive advantage in locating and acquiring attractive Senior Loans and CLO investments.

Charles M. Royce is a non-managing member of Oxford Lane Management. Mr. Royce has served as President since 1972, and a member of the Board of Managers since 2001, of Royce & Associates, LLC (“Royce & Associates”). He also manages or co-manages twelve of Royce & Associates’ open- and closed-end registered funds. Mr. Royce currently serves on the Board of Directors of The Royce Funds and TICC Capital Corp. Mr. Royce is also a non-managing member of TICC Management, LLC, the investment adviser for TICC Capital Corp. Mr. Royce, as a non-managing member of Oxford Lane Management, does not take part in the management or participate in the operations of Oxford Lane Management; however, Mr. Royce may be available from time to time to Oxford Lane Management to provide certain consulting services without compensation. Royce & Associates is a wholly owned subsidiary of Legg Mason, Inc.

In addition, we will pay BDC Partners, an affiliate of Oxford Lane Management, our allocable portion of overhead and other expenses incurred by BDC Partners in performing its obligations under an administration agreement by and among us and BDC Partners (the “Administration Agreement”), including rent, the fees and expenses associated with performing compliance functions, and our allocable portion of the compensation of our Chief Financial Officer, Chief Compliance Officer and any administrative support staff. These arrangements will create conflicts of interest that our Board of Directors must monitor.

Investment Focus

Our investment objective is to maximize our portfolio’s total return. We have initially implemented our investment objective by investing principally in the equity and junior debt tranches of CLO vehicles, which are collateralized primarily by a diverse portfolio of leveraged corporate loans, and which generally have very

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little or no exposure to real estate or mortgage loans or to pools of consumer-based debt, such as credit card receivables or auto loans. Our investment strategy may also included warehouse facilities, which are financing structures intended to aggregate loans that may be used to form the basis of a CLO vehicle. We may invest in securities issued by foreign entities, including foreign CLO vehicles.

The CLO investments we currently hold in our portfolio generally represent either a residual economic interest, in the case of an equity tranche, or a debt investment collateralized by a portfolio of Senior Loans. The value of our CLO investments generally depend on both the quality and nature of the underlying portfolio it references and also on the specific structural characteristics of the CLO itself, both of which are described below.

CLO Structural Elements

Structurally, CLO vehicles are entities formed to originate and manage a portfolio of loans. The loans within the CLO vehicle are limited to loans which meet established credit criteria and are subject to concentration limitations in order to limit a CLO vehicle’s exposure to a single credit.

A CLO vehicle is formed by raising multiple “tranches” of debt (with the most senior tranches being rated “AAA” to the most junior tranches typically being rated “BB” or “B”) and equity. As interest payments are received the CLO vehicle makes contractual interest payments to each tranche of debt based on their seniority. If there are funds remaining after each tranche of debt receives its contractual interest rate and the CLO vehicle meets or exceeds required collateral coverage levels (or other similar covenants) the remaining funds may be paid to the equity tranche. The contractual provisions setting out this order of payments are set out in detail in the CLO vehicle’s indenture. These provisions are referred to as the “priority of payments” or the “waterfall” and determine any other obligations that may be required to be paid ahead of payments of interest and principal on the securities issued by a CLO vehicle. In addition, for payments to be made to each tranche, after the most senior tranche of debt, there are various tests which must be complied with, which are different for each CLO vehicle.

CLO indentures typically provide for adjustments to the priority of payments in the event that certain cashflow or collateral requirements are not maintained. The collateral quality tests that may divert cashflows in the priority of payments are predominantly determined by reference to the par values of the underlying loans, rather than their current market values. Accordingly, we believe that CLO equity and junior debt investments allow investors to gain diversified exposure to the Senior Loan market on a levered basis without being structurally subject to mark-to-market price fluctuations of the underlying loans. As such, although the current valuations of CLO equity and junior debt tranches are expected to fluctuate based on price changes within the loan market, interest rate movements and other macroeconomic factors, those tranches will generally be expected to continue to receive distributions from the CLO vehicle periodically so long as the underlying portfolio does not suffer defaults, realized losses or other covenant violations sufficient to trigger changes in the waterfall allocations. We therefore believe that an investment portfolio consisting of CLO equity and junior debt investments of this type has the ability to provide attractive risk-adjusted rates of return.

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The diagram below is for illustrative purposes only. The CLO structure highlighted below is only a hypothetical structure and structures among CLO vehicles in which we may invest may vary substantially from the hypothetical example set forth below.

[GRAPHIC MISSING]

The Syndicated Senior Loan Market

We believe that while the syndicated leveraged corporate loan market is relatively large, with Standard and Poor’s estimating the total par value outstanding at approximately $742 billion as of May 27, 2014, this market remains largely inaccessible to a significant portion of investors that are not lenders or approved institutions. The CLO market permits wider exposure to syndicated Senior Loans, but this market is almost exclusively private and predominantly institutional.

The Senior Loan market is characterized by various factors, including:

• Seniority. A Senior Loan typically ranks senior in a company’s capital structure to all other forms of debt or equity. As such, that loan maintains the senior-most claim on the company’s assets and cash flow, and, we believe should, all other things being equal, offer the prospect of a relatively more stable and lower-risk holding.
• Floating rate instruments. A Senior Loan typically contains a floating versus a fixed interest rate, which we believe provides some measure of protection against the risk of interest rate fluctuation.
• Frequency of interest payments. A Senior Loan typically provides for scheduled interest payments no less frequently than quarterly.

In the current environment, we believe the above attributes seem particularly desirable.

Investment Opportunity

Despite strength across the credit markets broadly, we believe that the market for CLO-related assets continues to provide us with the opportunity to generate attractive risk-adjusted returns within our strategy. We believe that a number of factors support this conclusion, including:

— We believe that the long-term and relatively low-cost capital that many CLO vehicles have secured, compared with current asset spreads and associated LIBOR floors have created opportunities to purchase certain CLO equity and junior debt instruments that may produce attractive risk-adjusted returns. Although yields on Senior Loans have generally decreased since mid-2010, we believe that CLO equity and junior debt instruments still offer attractive risk-adjusted returns.
— We believe that the recently developed market to invest in warehouse financings, which are

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short-term facilities that are generally expected to form the basis of CLO vehicles (which the Fund may participate in or be repaid by), has created additional attractive risk-adjusted investment opportunities for us.
— We believe that investing in CLO securities and CLO equity instruments and warehouse financings in particular, requires a high level of research and analysis. We believe that typically this analysis can only be adequately conducted by knowledgeable market participants since that analysis tends to be highly specialized.
— We believe that a stronger credit market for Senior Loans has reduced the risk of collateral coverage test violations across many CLO structures, thereby reducing the risk that current cash distributions otherwise payable to junior debt tranches and/or equity will be diverted under the priority of payments to pay down the more senior obligations in various CLO structures.
— We believe that the US CLO market is relatively large with total assets under management of approximately $287 billion. (1) We estimate that the amount outstanding of the junior-most debt tranches (specifically the tranches originally rated “BB” and “B”) and equity tranches together are approximately $50 billion.

In addition to reviewing the junior debt and equity tranches of pre-2008 vintage CLOs, we have analyzed post-2010 CLOs (in both the primary and secondary markets) given the recent increase in new CLO issuance. From January 1, 2014 to April 29, 2014, CLOs closed stood at approximately $35 billion across 71 (2) deals (compared to approximately $82 billion across 171 deals for 2013). (3)

While the post-2010 CLOs generally have a higher cost of capital (which may result in lower returns for the equity investors in those CLOs) compared to pre-2008 CLOs, they may offer certain attractive structural features (including, in certain cases, better credit enhancement and lower leverage) and stronger collateral packages. We believe there are currently a significant number of these investment opportunities to consider and we have and continue to make investments in post-2010 CLOs.

We continue to review a large number of CLO investment vehicles in the current market environment, and we expect that the majority of our portfolio holdings, over the near to intermediate-term, will continue to be focused on CLO debt and equity securities, with the more significant focus over the near-term on CLO equity securities.

Summary Risk Factors

The value of our assets, as well as the market price of our securities, will fluctuate. Our investments may be risky, and you may lose all or part of your investment in us. Investing in Oxford Lane Capital involves other risks, including the following:

• We have a limited operating history as a closed-end investment company;
• We are dependent upon Oxford Lane Management’s key personnel for our future success;
• Our incentive fee structure and the formula for calculating the fee payable to Oxford Lane Management may incentivize Oxford Lane Management to pursue speculative investments, use leverage when it may be unwise to do so, or refrain from de-levering when it would otherwise be appropriate to do so;
• A general increase in interest rates may have the effect of making it easier for our investment adviser to receive incentive fees, without necessarily resulting in an increase in our net earnings due to the “catch up” feature of the incentive fee;
• CLO vehicles are very highly levered (typically 10-14 times), and therefore the junior debt and equity instruments in which we invest are subject to a higher degree of risk of total loss;

1. As of April 29, 2014. Source: RBS Securities, Inc., Intex Solutions, Inc.

2. As of April 28, 2014. Source: JP Morgan Chase & Co.

3. As of January 24, 2014. Source: RBS.

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• Our portfolio of investments may lack diversification among CLO vehicles which may subject us to a risk of significant loss if one or more of these CLO vehicles experiences a high level of defaults on its underlying Senior Loans;
• The Senior Loan portfolios of the CLO vehicles in which we will invest may be concentrated in a limited number of industries, which may subject those vehicles, and in turn us, to a risk of significant loss if there is a downturn in a particular industry in which a number of our CLO vehicles’ investments are concentrated;
• Our financial results may be affected adversely if one or more of our significant equity or junior debt investments in such CLO vehicles defaults on its payment obligations or fails to perform as we expect;
• Investing in CLO vehicles and other high-yield corporate credits involves a variety of risks, any of which may adversely impact our performance;
• Our equity investment distributions from CLO vehicles will likely be materially reduced if three month LIBOR increases;
• A disruption or downturn in the capital markets and the credit markets could impair our ability to raise capital and negatively affect our business;
• We may borrow money to leverage our portfolio, which would magnify the potential for gain or loss on amounts invested and may increase the risk of investing in us;
• Our investment portfolio will be recorded at fair value, with our Board of Directors having final responsibility for overseeing, reviewing and approving, in good faith, its estimate of fair value and, as a result, there will be uncertainty as to the value of our portfolio investments;
• We may experience fluctuations in our quarterly results;
• We will become subject to corporate-level income tax if we are unable to maintain our RIC status under Subchapter M of the Code;
• Common shares of closed-end management investment companies, including Oxford Lane Capital, have in the past frequently traded at discounts to their net asset values, and we cannot assure you that the market price of shares of our common stock will not decline below our net asset value per share;
• Our common stock price may be volatile and may decrease substantially;
• There is a risk that our stockholders may not receive distributions or that our distributions may not grow or may be reduced over time, including on a per share basis as a result of the dilutive effects of this offering;
• Regulations governing our operation as a registered closed-end management investment company affect our ability to raise additional capital and the way in which we do so. The raising of debt capital may expose us to risks, including the typical risks associated with leverage;
• Any amounts that we use to service our indebtedness or preferred dividends, or that we use to redeem our preferred stock, will not be available for distributions to our common stockholders;
• Our common stock is subject to the risk of subordination relative to holders of our debt instruments and holders of our preferred stock; and
• Holders of our preferred stock have the right to elect two members of our Board of Directors and class voting rights on certain matters.

See “Risk Factors” beginning on page 17 , and the other information included in this prospectus and any accompanying prospectus supplement, for additional discussion of factors you should carefully consider before investing in our securities.

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Operating and Regulatory Structure

Oxford Lane Capital is a Maryland corporation that is a non-diversified closed-end management investment company that has registered as an investment company under the 1940 Act. As a registered closed-end fund, we are required to meet regulatory tests. See “Regulation as a Registered Closed-End Investment Company.” We may also borrow funds to make investments. In addition, we have elected to be treated for federal income tax purposes, and intend to qualify annually, as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code. See “Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations.”

Our investment activities are managed by Oxford Lane Management and supervised by our Board of Directors. Oxford Lane Management is an investment adviser that is registered under the Advisers Act. Under our Investment Advisory Agreement, we have agreed to pay Oxford Lane Management an annual base management fee based on our gross assets as well as an incentive fee based on our performance. See “Investment Advisory Agreement.” We have also entered into an administration agreement with BDC Partners, which we refer to as the Administration Agreement, under which we have agreed to reimburse BDC Partners for our allocable portion of overhead and other expenses incurred by BDC Partners in performing its obligations under the Administration Agreement, including furnishing us with office facilities, equipment and clerical, bookkeeping and record keeping services at such facilities, as well as providing us with other administrative services. See “Administration Agreement.”

BDC Partners also serves as the managing member of Oxford Lane Management. Messrs. Cohen and Rosenthal, in turn, serve as the managing member and non-managing member, respectively, of BDC Partners.

Recent Developments

Preferred Stock Offering

On June 5, 2014, we completed an underwritten public offering of 1,120,000 shares of our newly designated 8.125% Series 2024 Term Preferred Shares at a public offering price of $25 per share, raising $28 million in gross proceeds. We also have granted the underwriters a 30-day option to purchase up to 168,000 additional shares of 8.125% Series 2024 Term Preferred Shares on the same terms and conditions to cover over-allotments, if any.

Dividend

On May 19, 2014, our Board of Directors declared a distribution of $0.60 per share of common stock for the first fiscal quarter of 2015, payable on June 30, 2014 to shareholders of record as of June 16, 2014.

On May 19, 2014, our Board of Directors declared dividends which are payable on the Series 2017 and Series 2023 Term Preferred Shares for the months of June 2014, July 2014 and August 2014.

Our Corporate Information

Our offices are located at 8 Sound Shore Drive, Suite 255, Greenwich, CT 06830, and our telephone number is (203) 983-5275.

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OFFERINGS

We may offer, from time to time, up to $500,000,000 of our common stock, preferred stock, subscription rights to purchase shares of our common stock or debt securities, on terms to be determined at the time of the offering. We will offer our securities at prices and on terms to be set forth in one or more supplements to this prospectus. The offering price per share of our securities, less any underwriting commissions or discounts, generally will not be less than the net asset value per share of our securities at the time of an offering. However, we may issue shares of our securities pursuant to this prospectus at a price per share that is less than our net asset value per share (i) in connection with a rights offering to our existing stockholders, (ii) with the prior approval of the majority of our common stockholders or (iii) under such other circumstances as the SEC may permit. Any such issuance of shares of our common stock below net asset value may be dilutive to the net asset value of our common stock. See “Risk Factors — Risks Relating to an Investment in our Common Stock.”

Our securities may be offered directly to one or more purchasers, or through agents designated from time to time by us, or to or through underwriters or dealers. The prospectus supplement relating to an offering will identify any agents or underwriters involved in the sale of our securities, and will disclose any applicable purchase price, fee, commission or discount arrangement between us and our agents or underwriters or among our underwriters or the basis upon which such amount may be calculated. See “Plan of Distribution.” We may not sell any of our securities through agents, underwriters or dealers without delivery of this prospectus and a prospectus supplement describing the method and terms of the offering of such securities.

Set forth below is additional information regarding offerings of our securities:

Use of Proceeds
We intend to use the net proceeds from the sale of our securities pursuant to this prospectus for acquiring investments in accordance with our investment objective and strategies described in this prospectus and for general working capital purposes. Each supplement to this prospectus relating to an offering will more fully identify the use of the proceeds from such offering. See “Use of Proceeds.”
NASDAQ Global Select Market symbols
“OXLC” (common stock)
“OXLCP” (Series 2017 Term Preferred Shares)
“OXLCO” (Series 2023 Term Preferred Shares)
“OXLCN” (Series 2024 Term Preferred Shares)
Distributions
To the extent that we have income available, we intend to distribute quarterly dividends to our common stockholders. The amount of our dividends, if any, will be determined by our Board of Directors. Any dividends to our stockholders will be declared out of assets legally available for distribution. The specific tax characteristics of our dividends will be reported to shareholders after the end of each calendar year.
Taxation
We have elected to be treated for federal income tax purposes as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code. As a RIC, we generally do not have to pay corporate-level federal income taxes on any ordinary income or capital gains that we distribute to our stockholders as dividends. To maintain our RIC tax treatment, we must meet specified source-of-income and asset diversification requirements and distribute annually at least 90% of our ordinary income and realized net short-term capital gains in excess of realized net long-term capital losses, if any. See “Distributions” and “Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations.”

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Investment Advisory Fees
We pay Oxford Lane Management a fee for its services under the Investment Advisory Agreement consisting of two components — a base management fee and an incentive fee. The base management fee is calculated at an annual rate of 2.00% of our gross assets, which includes any borrowings for investment purposes. The incentive fee is calculated and payable quarterly in arrears and equals 20.0% of our “pre-incentive fee net investment income” for the immediately preceding quarter, subject to a preferred return, or “hurdle,” and a “catch up” feature. No incentive fees are payable to our investment adviser on any realized capital gains. See “Investment Advisory Agreement.”
Administration Agreement
We reimburse BDC Partners for our allocable portion of overhead and other expenses it incurs in performing its obligations under the Administration Agreement, including furnishing us with office facilities, equipment and clerical, bookkeeping and record keeping services at such facilities, as well as providing us with other administrative services. In addition, we reimburse BDC Partners for the fees and expenses associated with performing compliance functions, and our allocable portion of the compensation of our Chief Financial Officer, Chief Compliance Officer and any administrative support staff. See “Administration Agreement.”
Leverage
Other than our currently outstanding preferred stock, which may be considered a form of leverage, we do not currently anticipate incurring indebtedness on our portfolio or paying any interest during the twelve months following completion of this offering. However, we may issue additional shares of preferred stock pursuant to the registration statement of which this prospectus forms a part. Although we have no current intention to do so, we may borrow funds to make investments. As a result, we may be exposed to the risks of leverage, which may be considered a speculative investment technique. In addition, the CLO vehicles in which we invest will be leveraged, which will indirectly expose us to the risks of leverage. The use of leverage magnifies the potential gain and loss on amounts invested and therefore increases the risks associated with investing in our securities. In addition, the costs associated with our borrowings, including any increase in the management fee payable to our investment adviser, Oxford Lane Management, will be borne by our common stockholders. Under the 1940 Act, we are only permitted to incur additional indebtedness to the extent our asset coverage, as defined under the 1940 Act, is at least 300% immediately after each such borrowing. See “Regulation as a Registered Closed-End Investment Company.”
Trading
Shares of closed-end investment companies frequently trade at a discount to their net asset value. The risk that our shares may trade at a discount to our net asset value is separate and distinct from the risk that our net asset value per share may decline. We cannot predict whether our shares will trade above, at or below net asset value.
Dividend Reinvestment Plan
We have adopted an “opt out” dividend reinvestment plan. If your shares of common stock are registered in your own name, your distributions will automatically be reinvested under our dividend

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reinvestment plan in additional whole and fractional shares of common stock, unless you “opt out” of our dividend reinvestment plan so as to receive cash dividends by delivering a written notice to our dividend paying agent. If your shares are held in the name of a broker or other nominee, you should contact the broker or nominee for details regarding opting out of our dividend reinvestment plan. Stockholders who receive distributions in the form of stock will be subject to the same federal, state and local tax consequences as stockholders who elect to receive their distributions in cash. See “Dividend Reinvestment Plan.”
Certain Anti-Takeover Measures
Our charter and bylaws, as well as certain statutory and regulatory requirements, contain certain provisions that may have the effect of discouraging a third party from making an acquisition proposal for us. These anti-takeover provisions may inhibit a change in control in circumstances that could give the holders of our common stock the opportunity to realize a premium over the market price for our common stock. See “Description of Securities.”
Available Information
After the completion of this offering, we will be required to file periodic reports, proxy statements and other information with the SEC. This information will be available at the SEC’s public reference room at 100 F Street, NE, Washington, D.C. 20549 and on the SEC’s website at http://www.sec.gov . The public may obtain information on the operation of the SEC’s public reference room by calling the SEC at (202) 551-8090. This information will also be available free of charge by contacting us at Oxford Lane Capital Corp., 8 Sound Shore Drive, Suite 255, Greenwich, CT 06830, by telephone at (203) 983-5275, or on our website at http://www.oxfordlanecapital.com .

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FEES AND EXPENSES

The following table is intended to assist you in understanding the costs and expenses that you will bear directly or indirectly. We caution you that some of the percentages indicated in the table below are estimates and may vary. Except where the context suggests otherwise, whenever this prospectus contains a reference to fees or expenses paid by “us” or “Oxford Lane Capital,” or that “we” will pay fees or expenses, you will indirectly bear such fees or expenses as an investor in Oxford Lane Capital Corp.

Stockholder transaction expenses:
Sales load (as a percentage of offering price) — % (1)
Offering expenses borne by us (as a percentage of offering price) — % (2)
Dividend reinvestment plan expenses None (3)
Total stockholder transaction expenses (as a percentage of offering price) — %
Annual expenses (as a percentage of net assets attributable to common stock):
Base management fee 3.27 % (4)
Incentive fees payable under our investment advisory agreement (20% of net investment income) 0.87 % (5)
Interest payments on borrowed funds 0.00 % (6)
Preferred stock dividend payment 4.28 % (7)
Other expenses (estimated) 1.05 % (8)
Acquired fund fees and expenses 4.22 % (9)
Total annual expenses (estimated) 13.69 %

Example

The following example demonstrates the projected dollar amount of total cumulative expenses that would be incurred over various periods with respect to a hypothetical investment in our common stock. In calculating the following expense amounts, we have assumed that our annual operating expenses would remain at the levels set forth in the table above. See Note 6 below for additional information regarding certain assumptions regarding our level of leverage subsequent to this offering.

In the event that shares to which this prospectus relates are sold to or through underwriters, a corresponding prospectus supplement will restate this example to reflect the applicable sales load.

1 Year 3 Years 5 Years 10 Years
You would pay the following expenses on a $1,000 investment, assuming a 5% annual return $ 131 $ 360 $ 550 $ 900

The example and the expenses in the tables above should not be considered a representation of our future expenses, and actual expenses may be greater or less than those shown. While the example assumes, as required by the SEC, a 5.0% annual return, our performance will vary and may result in a return greater or less than 5.0%. The incentive fee under the Investment Advisory Agreement, which, assuming a 5.0% annual return, would either not be payable or would have an insignificant impact on the expense amounts shown above, is not included in the example. Also, while the example assumes reinvestment of all dividends at net asset value, participants in our dividend reinvestment plan will receive a number of shares of our common stock, determined by dividing the total dollar amount of the dividend payable to a participant by the market price per share of our common stock at the close of trading on the dividend payment date, which may be at, above or below net asset value. See “Dividend Reinvestment Plan” for additional information regarding our dividend reinvestment plan.

(1) In the event that the securities to which this prospectus relates are sold to or through underwriters, a corresponding prospectus supplement will disclose the applicable sales load and the “Example” will be updated accordingly.
(2) The prospectus supplement corresponding to each offering will disclose the applicable offering expenses and total stockholder transaction expenses as a percentage of the offering price.

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(3) The expenses of the dividend reinvestment plan are included in “other expenses.”
(4) Assumes gross assets of $405.4 million and $134.6 million of leverage (including $15.8 million of preferred stock with a preferred rate of 8.5% per annum issued in November 2012, $65.8 million of preferred stock with a preferred rate of 7.5% per annum issued in June, July and November 2013, $28.0 million of preferred stock with a preferred rate of 8.125% per annum issued in June 2014 and an assumed additional $25.0 million in preferred stock with a preferred rate of 8.25% per annum, and reflects the direct registered offering of 325,000 shares of common stock on January 9, 2014, the issuance of 4,021,373 shares in connection with our rights offering that expired on March 3, 2014, as well as the issuance of 3,100,000 shares of common stock on March 14, 2014), and assumes net assets of $247.8 million. The above calculation reflects our base management fee as a percentage of our net assets. Our base management fee under the Investment Advisory Agreement, however, is based on our gross assets, which is defined as all the assets of Oxford Lane Capital, including those acquired using borrowings for investment purposes. As a result, to the extent we use leverage, it would have the effect of increasing our base management fee as a percentage of our net assets. See “Investment Advisory Agreement.”
(5) Amount reflects the estimated annual incentive fees payable to our investment adviser, Oxford Lane Management, during the fiscal year following this offering. The estimate assumes that the incentive fee earned will be proportional to the fee earned during the year ended March 31, 2014. Based on our current business plan, we anticipate that substantially all of the net proceeds of any offerings conducted pursuant to this prospectus will be invested within three months depending on the availability of investment opportunities that are consistent with our investment objective and other market conditions. We expect that it will take approximately one to three months to invest all of the proceeds of any offerings conducted pursuant to this prospectus, in part because equity and junior debt investments in CLO vehicles require substantial due diligence prior to investment.

The incentive fee, which is payable quarterly in arrears, equals 20.0% of the excess, if any, of our “Pre-Incentive Fee Net Investment Income” that exceeds a 1.75% quarterly (7.0% annualized) hurdle rate, which we refer to as the Hurdle, subject to a “catch-up” provision measured at the end of each calendar quarter. The incentive fee is computed and paid on income that may include interest that is accrued but not yet received in cash. The operation of the incentive fee for each quarter is as follows:

• no incentive fee is payable to our investment adviser in any calendar quarter in which our Pre-Incentive Fee Net Investment Income does not exceed the Hurdle of 1.75%;
• 100% of our Pre-Incentive Fee Net Investment Income with respect to that portion of such Pre-Incentive Fee Net Investment Income, if any, that exceeds the Hurdle but is less than 2.1875% in any calendar quarter (8.75% annualized) is payable to our investment adviser. We refer to this portion of our Pre-Incentive Fee Net Investment Income (which exceeds the Hurdle but is less than 2.1875%) as the “catch-up.” The “catch-up” is meant to provide our investment adviser with 20.0% of our Pre-Incentive Fee Net Investment Income, as if a Hurdle did not apply when our Pre-Incentive Fee Net Investment Income exceeds 2.1875% in any calendar quarter; and
• 20.0% of the amount of our Pre-Incentive Fee Net Investment Income, if any, that exceeds 2.1875% in any calendar quarter (8.75% annualized) is payable to our investment adviser (once the Hurdle is reached and the catch-up is achieved, 20.0% of all Pre-Incentive Fee Investment Income thereafter is allocated to our investment adviser).

No incentive fee is payable to our investment adviser on realized capital gains. For a more detailed discussion of the calculation of this fee, see “Investment Advisory Agreement.”

(6) Assumes that we maintain our current level of no outstanding borrowings as of March 31, 2014 other than preferred stock (we presently have $15.8 million of preferred stock outstanding with a preferred rate equal to 8.5% per annum issued in November 2012, an aggregate of $65.8 million of preferred stock with a preferred rate of 7.50% per annum issued in June, July and November 2013 and an aggregate of $28.0 million of preferred stock with a preferred rate of 8.125% per annum issued in June 2014), which may be considered a form of leverage. We may issue additional shares of preferred stock pursuant to the registration statement of which the accompanying prospectus forms a part. In the event we were to issue

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preferred stock, our borrowing costs, and correspondingly our total annual expenses, including our base management fee as a percentage of our net assets, would increase. See also note 7 below.
(7) Assumes that we continue to have $15.8 million of preferred stock outstanding with a preferred rate equal to 8.5% per annum issued in November 2012, an aggregate of $65.8 million of preferred stock with a preferred rate of 7.50% per annum issued in June, July and November 2013, an aggregate of $28.0 million of preferred stock with a preferred rate of 8.125% per annum issued in June 2014 and that we issue an additional $25.0 million of preferred stock with a preferred rate of 8.25% per annum.
(8) “Other expenses” ($2.6 million) assumes that other expenses for the year will be proportional to other expenses incurred during the year ended March 31, 2014.
(9) Reflects the estimated annual collateral manager fees that will be indirectly incurred by us in connection with our investments in CLO equity tranches during the twelve months following the date of this prospectus, assuming the CLO equity investments held as of March 31, 2014 and net assets of $247.8 million. Collateral manager fees are charged on the total assets of the CLO vehicle, including the assets acquired with borrowed funds, but are assumed to be paid from the residual cash flows after interest payments to the senior debt tranches. Therefore, these collateral manager fees (which are generally 0.50% to 0.55% of total assets) are effectively much higher when allocated only to the equity tranches. The debt tranches that we hold generally are not deemed to pay any such collateral manager fees. The calculation does not include any other operating expense ratios of the CLO vehicles, as these amounts are not routinely reported to shareholders on a basis consistent with this methodology; however, it is estimated that additional operating expenses of approximately 0.5% to 1.0% could be incurred. As a result of our investments in such CLO equity investments, our stockholders will be required to pay two levels of fees and expenses in connection with their investment in our common stock, including fees payable under our Investment Advisory Agreement and fees and expenses charged to us on the CLO equity tranches in which we are invested.

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FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS

The financial highlights table is intended to help you understand our financial performance. Information is shown since the commencement of our operations on January 25, 2011. The financial data for the fiscal years ended March 31, 2014, March 31, 2013, March 31, 2012 and for the period from January 25, 2011 (commencement of operations) to March 31, 2011 is derived from our financial statements which have been audited by PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, our independent registered public accounting firm. The data should be read in conjunction with our financial statements and related notes thereto included in this prospectus.

Year Ended
March 31, 2014
Year Ended
March 31, 2013
Year Ended
March 31, 2012
January 25, 2011
(Commencement
of Operations) to
March 31, 2011
Per Share Data
Net asset value at beginning of period (1) $ 16.20 $ 17.05 $ 18.19 $ 16.80
Net investment income (2) 1.24 1.17 1.19 0.07
Net realized and unrealized capital gains (3) 1.56 3.54 0.83 (0.03 )
Total from investment operations 2.80 4.71 2.02 0.04
Distributions from net investment income (1.97 ) (2.20 ) (2.05 ) (0.25 )
Distributions from net realized gain on investments (0.38 ) (0.07 ) — —
Distributions based on weighted average share impact (0.51 ) (0.28 ) (0.10 ) —
Total distributions (4) (2.86 ) (2.48 ) (2.15 ) (0.25 )
Effect of shares issued, net of underwriting expense (5) 0.16 (2.52 ) (0.77 ) 1.79
Effect of offering costs (5) (0.04 ) (0.56 ) (0.24 ) (0.19 )
Effect of shares issued, net (5) 0.12 (3.08 ) (1.01 ) 1.60
Net asset value at end of period $ 16.26 $ 16.20 $ 17.05 $ 18.19
Per share market value at beginning of period $ 15.98 $ 14.60 $ 18.75 $ 20.00
Per share market value at end of period $ 16.70 $ 15.98 $ 14.60 $ 18.75
Total return (6) (7) 20.23 % 26.21 % (10.75 %) (5.0 %)
Shares outstanding at end of period 15,240,729 7,602,719 2,456,511 1,861,250
Ratios/Supplemental Data
Net assets at end of period (000’s) $ 247,829 $ 123,140 $ 41,879 $ 33,863
Ratio of net investment income to average daily net assets 6.55 % 5.90 % 7.18 % 3.51 % (8)
Ratio of expenses to average daily net assets 8.38 % 5.65 % 6.50 % 4.79 % (8)
Portfolio turnover rate 28.81 % 12.29 % 0.22 % 0.05 %

(1) For period January 25, 2011 through March 31, 2011, represents the net asset value per share prior to commencement of operations.
(2) Represents per share net investment income for the period, based upon average shares outstanding.
(3) Net realized and unrealized capital gains include rounding adjustments, if necessary, to reconcile change in net asset value per share.
(4) Management monitors available taxable earnings, including net investment income and realized capital gains, to determine if a tax return of capital may occur for the year. To the extent the Fund's taxable earnings fall below the total amount of the Fund's distributions for that fiscal year, a portion of those

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distributions may be deemed a tax return of capital to the Fund's stockholders. The final determination of the nature of our distributions can only be made upon the filing of our tax return.
(5) Based upon actual shares outstanding upon share issuance.
(6) Total return based on market value is calculated assuming that shares of the Fund's common stock were purchased at the market price as of the beginning of the period, dividends, capital gains and other distributions were reinvested as provided for in the Fund's dividend reinvestment plan and then sold at the closing market price per share on the last day of the period. The computation does not reflect any sales commission investors may incur in purchasing or selling shares of the Fund.
(7) Total return for the period January 25, 2011 through March 31, 2011 was not annualized.
(8) Annualized, after adjusting for certain periodic expenses recorded during the period January 25, 2011 through March 31, 2011.

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RISK FACTORS

Investing in our securities involves a number of significant risks. In addition to the other information contained in this prospectus and any accompanying prospectus supplement, you should consider carefully the following information before making an investment in our securities. The risks set out below are not the only risks we face. Additional risks and uncertainties not presently known to us or not presently deemed material by us might also impair our operations and performance. If any of the following events occur, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected. In such case, our net asset value and the trading price of our common stock could decline, and you may lose all or part of your investment.

Risks Relating to Our Business and Structure

We have a limited operating history as a closed-end investment company.

We are a non-diversified, closed-end management investment company with a limited operating history of only three years. As a result, we do not have significant financial information on which you can evaluate an investment in our company or our prior performance. We are subject to all of the business risks and uncertainties associated with any new business, including the risk that we will not achieve our investment objective and that the value of your investment could decline substantially or become worthless. We anticipate that it may take approximately one to three months to invest substantially all of the net proceeds of this offering in our targeted investments. During this period, we will invest in temporary investments, such as cash, cash equivalents, U.S. government securities and other high-quality debt investments that mature in one year or less, which we expect will earn yields substantially lower than the interest or other income that we anticipate receiving in respect of investments in CLO vehicles or other debt securities. As a result, our dividends may be substantially lower than the dividends that we expect to pay when the proceeds of this offering have been fully invested in accordance with our investment objective.

Our investment portfolio is recorded at fair value, with our Board of Directors having final responsibility for overseeing, reviewing and approving, in good faith, its estimate of fair value and, as a result, there will be uncertainty as to the value of our portfolio investments.

Under the 1940 Act, we are required to carry our portfolio investments at market value or, if there is no readily available market value, at fair value as determined by us in accordance with our written valuation policy with our Board of Directors having final responsibility for overseeing, reviewing and approving, in good faith, our estimate of fair value. Typically, there will not be a public market for the type of investments we target. As a result, we will value these securities quarterly at fair value based on relevant information compiled by our investment adviser, third-party pricing services (when available) and our Valuation Committee and with the oversight, review and approval of our Board of Directors.

The determination of fair value and, consequently, the amount of unrealized gains and losses in our portfolio, are to a certain degree subjective and dependent on a valuation process approved by our Board of Directors. Certain factors that may be considered in determining the fair value of our investments include available indicative bids or quotations, as well as external events, such as private mergers, sales and acquisitions involving comparable companies. Because such valuations, and particularly valuations of private securities, are inherently uncertain, they may fluctuate over short periods of time and may be based on estimates. Our determinations of fair value may differ materially from the values that would have been used if an active public market for these securities existed. Our determinations of the fair value of our investments have a material impact on our net earnings through the recording of unrealized appreciation or depreciation of investments and may cause our net asset value on a given date to materially understate or overstate the value that we may ultimately realize on one or more of our investments. Investors purchasing our securities based on an overstated net asset value may pay a higher price than the value of our investments might warrant. Conversely, investors selling shares during a period in which the net asset value understates the value of our investments may receive a lower price for their shares than the value of our investments might warrant.

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Our financial condition and results of operations depend on our ability to effectively manage and deploy capital.

Our ability to achieve our investment objective depends on our ability to effectively manage and deploy capital, which depends, in turn, on our investment adviser’s ability to identify, evaluate and monitor, and our ability to acquire, investments that meet our investment criteria.

Accomplishing our investment objective on a cost-effective basis is largely a function of our investment adviser’s handling of the investment process, its ability to provide competent, attentive and efficient services and our access to investments offering acceptable terms, either in the primary or secondary markets. Even if we are able to grow and build upon our investment operations, any failure to manage our growth effectively could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. The results of our operations will depend on many factors, including the availability of opportunities for investment, readily accessible short and long-term funding alternatives in the financial markets and economic conditions. Furthermore, if we cannot successfully operate our business or implement our investment policies and strategies as described herein, it could negatively impact our ability to pay dividends.

We may face increasing competition for investment opportunities.

We may compete for investments with other investment funds (potentially including private equity funds, mezzanine funds and business development companies), as well as traditional financial services companies, which could include commercial banks, investment banks, finance companies and other sources of funding. Many of our competitors are substantially larger and have considerably greater financial, technical and marketing resources than us. For example, some competitors may have a lower cost of capital and access to funding sources that may not be available to us, including from federal government agencies through federal rescue programs such as the U.S. Department of Treasury’s Financial Stability Plan (formerly known as the Troubled Asset Relief Program). In addition, some of our competitors may have higher risk tolerances or different risk assessments than we have. These characteristics could allow our competitors to consider a wider variety of investments, establish more relationships and offer higher pricing than we are willing to offer to potential sellers. We may lose investment opportunities if our competitors are willing to pay more for the types of investments that we intend to target. If we are forced to pay more for our investments, we may not be able to achieve acceptable returns on our investments or may bear substantial risk of capital loss. An increase in the number and/or the size of our competitors in our target markets could force us to accept less attractive investments. Furthermore, many of our competitors have greater experience operating under, or are not be subject to, the regulatory restrictions that the 1940 Act imposes on us as a closed-end management investment company.

We are dependent upon Oxford Lane Management’s key personnel for our future success.

We depend on the diligence, skill and network of business contacts of Messrs. Cohen, Rosenthal and Monasebian, who serve as the investment committee of Oxford Lane Management, and who lead Oxford Lane Management’s investment team. Messrs. Cohen, Rosenthal and Monasebian, together with the other investment professionals available to Oxford Lane Management, evaluate, acquire and monitor our investments. Our future success depends on the continued service of Messrs. Cohen, Rosenthal and Monasebian and the other members of Oxford Lane Management’s investment team. We cannot assure you that unforeseen business, medical, personal or other circumstances would not lead any such individual to terminate his relationship with us. The loss of Messrs. Cohen, Rosenthal or Monasebian, or any of the other investment professionals who serve on Oxford Lane Management’s investment team, could have a material adverse effect on our ability to achieve our investment objective as well as on our financial condition and results of operations. In addition, we can offer no assurance that Oxford Lane Management will continue indefinitely as our investment adviser.

The members of Oxford Lane Management’s investment team are and may in the future become affiliated with entities engaged in business activities similar to those intended to be conducted by us, and may have conflicts of interest in allocating their time. In particular, the members of Oxford Lane Management’s investment team, including Messrs. Cohen, Rosenthal and Monasebian, are currently actively involved in the management of the portfolios of TICC Capital Corp., a publicly-traded business development company that

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invests principally in the debt of U.S.-based companies, TICC CLO LLC and TICC CLO 2012-1 LLC, CLO structured finance vehicles that invest in a diversified portfolio of Senior Loans, the assets of which are included in the gross assets of TICC Capital Corp., and T2 Income Fund CLO I Ltd., a CLO structured finance vehicle that invests in a diversified portfolio of Senior Loans. Neither Messrs. Cohen, Rosenthal or Monasebian, or the investment team, is required to dedicate any specific portion of their time to the activities of Oxford Lane Capital; moreover, they are engaged in other business activities which divert their time and attention.

Our success depends on the ability of Oxford Lane Management to retain qualified personnel in a competitive environment.

Our success requires that Oxford Lane Management retain investment and administrative personnel in a competitive market. Its ability to attract and retain personnel with the requisite credentials, experience and skills depends on several factors including, but not limited to, its ability to offer competitive wages, benefits and professional growth opportunities. Many of the entities, including investment funds (such as private equity funds, mezzanine funds and business development companies) and traditional financial services companies, with which we compete for experienced personnel have greater resources than we have.

There are significant potential conflicts of interest which could impact our investment returns.

Oxford Lane Management’s investment team presently manages the portfolios of TICC Capital Corp., a publicly-traded business development company that invests principally in the debt of U.S.-based companies, TICC CLO LLC and TICC CLO 2012-1 LLC, CLO structured finance vehicles that invest in a diversified portfolio of Senior Loans, the assets of which are included in the gross assets of TICC Capital Corp., and T2 Income Fund CLO I Ltd., a CLO structured finance vehicle that invests in a diversified portfolio of Senior Loans. In addition, our executive officers and directors, as well as the current and future members of our investment adviser, Oxford Lane Management, may serve as officers, directors or principals of other entities that operate in the same or a related line of business as we do. Accordingly, they may have obligations to investors in those entities, the fulfillment of which obligations may not be in the best interests of us or our stockholders. Each of TICC Capital Corp., TICC CLO LLC, TICC CLO 2012-1 LLC and T2 Income Fund CLO I Ltd., as well as any affiliated investment vehicle formed in the future and managed by our investment adviser or its affiliates may, notwithstanding different stated investment objectives, have overlapping investment objectives with our own and, accordingly, may invest in asset classes similar to those targeted by us. As a result, Oxford Lane Management’s investment team may face conflicts in allocating investment opportunities between us and such other entities. Although Oxford Lane Management’s investment team will endeavor to allocate investment opportunities in a fair and equitable manner, it is possible that, in the future, we may not be given the opportunity to participate in investments made by investment funds, including TICC Capital Corp., TICC CLO LLC, TICC CLO 2012-1 LLC, and T2 Income Fund CLO I Ltd., managed by our investment adviser or an investment manager affiliated with our investment adviser. In any such case, when Oxford Lane Management’s investment team identifies an investment, it will be required to choose which investment fund should make the investment, although BDC Partners maintains an allocation policy to ensure the equitable distribution of such investment opportunities, consistent with the requirements of the 1940 Act.

In certain instances, we may co-invest on a concurrent basis with affiliates of our investment adviser, subject to compliance with applicable regulations and regulatory guidance and our written allocation procedures. Such co-investment may require exemptive relief from the SEC. If we elect to seek such relief, there can be no assurance when, or if, such relief may be obtained.

In addition, we will pay BDC Partners, an affiliate of Oxford Lane Management, our allocable portion of overhead and other expenses incurred by BDC Partners in performing its obligations under the Administration Agreement, including rent, the fees and expenses associated with performing compliance functions, and our allocable portion of the compensation of our Chief Financial Officer, Chief Compliance Officer and any administrative support staff. These arrangements may create conflicts of interest that our Board of Directors must monitor. Oxford Lane Management will not be reimbursed for any performance-related compensation of its employees.

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Our incentive fee structure and the formula for calculating the fee payable to Oxford Lane Management may incentivize Oxford Lane Management to pursue speculative investments, use leverage when it may be unwise to do so, or refrain from de-levering when it would otherwise be appropriate to do so.

The incentive fee payable by us to Oxford Lane Management may create an incentive for Oxford Lane Management to pursue investments on our behalf that are riskier or more speculative than would be the case in the absence of such compensation arrangement. Such a practice could result in our investing in more speculative securities than would otherwise be the case, which could result in higher investment losses, particularly during economic downturns. The incentive fee payable to our investment adviser is based on our pre-incentive net investment income, as calculated in accordance with our Investment Advisory Agreement. In addition, our base management fee is calculated on the basis of our gross assets, including assets acquired through the use of leverage. This may encourage our investment adviser to use leverage to increase the aggregate amount of and the return on our investments, even when it may not be appropriate to do so, and to refrain from de-levering when it would otherwise be appropriate to do so. Under certain circumstances, the use of leverage may increase the likelihood of default, which would impair the value of our securities.

We may invest, to the extent permitted by law, in the securities and other instruments of other investment companies, including private funds, and, to the extent we so invest, will bear our ratable share of any such investment company’s expenses, including management and performance fees. We will also remain obligated to pay management and incentive fees to Oxford Lane Management with respect to the assets invested in the securities and other instruments of other investment companies. With respect to each of these investments, each of our stockholders will bear his or her share of the management and incentive fee of Oxford Lane Management as well as indirectly bearing the management and performance fees and other expenses of any investment companies in which we invest.

In the course of our investing activities, we will pay management and incentive fees to Oxford Lane Management and reimburse Oxford Lane Management for certain expenses it incurs. As a result, investors in our common stock will invest on a “gross” basis and receive distributions on a “net” basis after expenses, resulting in a lower rate of return than an investor might achieve through direct investments.

A general increase in interest rates may have the effect of making it easier for our investment adviser to receive incentive fees, without necessarily resulting in an increase in our net earnings.

Given the structure of our Investment Advisory Agreement with Oxford Lane Management, any general increase in interest rates will likely have the effect of making it easier for Oxford Lane Management to meet the quarterly hurdle rate for payment of income incentive fees under the Investment Advisory Agreement without any additional increase in relative performance on the part of our investment adviser. In addition, in view of the catch-up provision applicable to income incentive fees under the Investment Advisory Agreement, our investment adviser could potentially receive a significant portion of the increase in our investment income attributable to such a general increase in interest rates. If that were to occur, our increase in net earnings, if any, would likely be significantly smaller than the relative increase in our investment adviser’s income incentive fee resulting from such a general increase in interest rates.

Our investment adviser has the right to resign on 60 days’ notice, and we may not be able to find a suitable replacement within that time, resulting in a disruption in our operations that could adversely affect our financial condition, business and results of operations.

Our investment adviser has the right, under the Investment Advisory Agreement, to resign at any time upon 60 days’ written notice, whether we have found a replacement or not. If our investment adviser resigns, we may not be able to find a new investment adviser or hire internal management with similar expertise and ability to provide the same or equivalent services on acceptable terms within 60 days, or at all. If we are unable to do so quickly, our operations are likely to experience a disruption, our financial condition, business and results of operations as well as our ability to pay distributions are likely to be adversely affected and the market price of our shares may decline. In addition, the coordination of our internal management and investment activities is likely to suffer if we are unable to identify and reach an agreement with a single institution or group of executives having the expertise possessed by our investment adviser and its affiliates. Even if we are able to retain comparable management, whether internal or external, the integration of such

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management and their lack of familiarity with our investment objective may result in additional costs and time delays that may adversely affect our financial condition, business and results of operations.

Our investment adviser may not be able to achieve the same or similar returns as those achieved by Messrs. Cohen and Rosenthal while managing other portfolios.

Although Messrs. Cohen and Rosenthal have experience managing other investment portfolios, including those of TICC Capital Corp., a publicly traded business development company that invests principally in the debt of U.S.-based companies, TICC CLO LLC and TICC CLO 2012-1 LLC, CLO structured finance vehicles that invest in a diversified portfolio of Senior Loans, the assets of which are included in the gross assets of TICC Capital Corp., and T2 Income Fund CLO I Ltd., a CLO structured finance vehicle that invests in a diversified portfolio of Senior Loans, their track record and prior achievements are not necessarily indicative of future results that will be achieved by our investment adviser. We cannot assure you that we will be able to achieve the results realized by other vehicles managed by Messrs. Cohen and Rosenthal, including TICC Capital Corp., and T2 Income Fund CLO I Ltd.

Regulations governing our operation as a registered closed-end management investment company affect our ability to raise additional capital and the way in which we do so. The raising of debt capital may expose us to risks, including the typical risks associated with leverage.

Although we have no current intention to do so, we may in the future issue debt securities or additional shares of preferred stock and/or borrow money from banks or other financial institutions, which we refer to collectively as “senior securities,” up to the maximum amount permitted by the 1940 Act. Under the provisions of the 1940 Act, we will be permitted, as a registered closed-end management investment company, to issue senior securities representing indebtedness so long as our asset coverage ratio with respect thereto, defined under the 1940 Act as the ratio of our gross assets (less all liabilities and indebtedness not represented by senior securities) to our outstanding senior securities representing indebtedness, is at least 300% after each issuance of such senior securities. In addition, we will be permitted to issue additional shares of preferred stock so long as our asset coverage ratio with respect thereto, defined under the 1940 Act as the ratio of our gross assets (less all liabilities and indebtedness not represented by senior securities) to our outstanding senior securities representing indebtedness, plus the aggregate involuntary liquidation preference of our outstanding preferred stock, is at least 200% after each issuance of such preferred stock. If the value of our assets declines, we may be unable to satisfy this test. If that happens, we may be required to sell a portion of our investments and, depending on the nature of our leverage, repay a portion of our indebtedness or redeem outstanding shares of preferred stock, in each case at a time when doing so may be disadvantageous. Also, any amounts that we use to service our indebtedness or preferred dividends would not be available for distributions to our common stockholders. Furthermore, as a result of issuing senior securities, we would also be exposed to typical risks associated with leverage, including an increased risk of loss. If we issue additional preferred stock, the preferred stock would continue to rank “senior” to common stock in our capital structure, preferred stockholders would continue to have separate voting rights on certain matters and might have other rights, preferences, or privileges more favorable than those of our common stockholders, and the issuance of additional shares of preferred stock could have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing a transaction or a change of control that might involve a premium price for holders of our common stock or otherwise be in your best interest.

We are not generally able to issue and sell our common stock at a price below net asset value per share, other than in connection with a rights offering to our existing stockholders. We may, however, sell our common stock at a price below the then-current net asset value per share of our common stock if our Board of Directors determines that such sale is in the best interests of Oxford Lane Capital and our stockholders, and our stockholders approve such sale. In any such case, the price at which our securities are to be issued and sold may not be less than a price that, in the determination of our Board of Directors, closely approximates the market value of such securities (less any distributing commission or discount). If we raise additional funds by issuing more common stock, then the percentage ownership of our stockholders at that time will decrease, and you may experience dilution.

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We may borrow money and/or issue preferred stock to leverage our portfolio, which would magnify the potential for gain or loss on amounts invested and will increase the risk of investing in us.

The use of leverage magnifies the potential for gain or loss on amounts invested and, therefore, increases the risks associated with investing in our securities. We presently have $15.8 million of preferred stock outstanding with a preferred rate equal to 8.5% per annum issued in November 2012, an aggregate of $65.8 million of preferred stock with a preferred rate of 7.50% per annum issued in June, July and November 2013 and an aggregate of $28.0 million of preferred stock with a preferred rate of 8.125% per annum issued in June 2014. Although we have no current intention to do so, we may borrow from and issue senior securities, including additional shares of preferred stock, to banks, insurance companies and other lenders in the future. Holders of these senior securities will have fixed dollar claims on our assets that are superior to the claims of our common stockholders, and we would expect such lenders to seek recovery against our assets in the event of a default. If the value of our assets decreases, leveraging would cause net asset value to decline more sharply than it otherwise would have had we not leveraged. Similarly, any decrease in our income would cause net income to decline more sharply than it would have had we not borrowed. Such a decline could also negatively affect our ability to make dividend payments on our common stock. Leverage is generally considered a speculative investment technique. Our ability to service any debt that we incur will depend largely on our financial performance and will be subject to prevailing economic conditions and competitive pressures. Moreover, as the management fee payable to our investment adviser, Oxford Lane Management, will be payable based on our gross assets, including those assets acquired through the use of leverage, Oxford Lane Management will have a financial incentive to incur leverage which may not be consistent with our stockholders’ interests. In addition, our common stockholders will bear the burden of any increase in our expenses as a result of leverage, including any increase in the management fee payable to Oxford Lane Management.

As a registered closed-end management investment company, we will generally be required to meet an asset coverage ratio with respect to our outstanding senior securities representing indebtedness, defined under the 1940 Act as the ratio of our gross assets (less all liabilities and indebtedness not represented by senior securities) to our outstanding senior securities representing indebtedness, of at least 300% after each issuance of senior securities representing indebtedness. In addition, we will generally be required to meet an asset coverage ratio with respect to our outstanding preferred stock, as defined under the 1940 Act as the ratio of our gross assets (less all liabilities and indebtedness not represented by senior securities) to our outstanding senior securities representing indebtedness, plus the aggregate involuntary liquidation preference of our outstanding preferred stock, of at least 200% immediately after each issuance of such preferred stock. If this ratio declines, we may not be able to incur additional debt or issue additional shares of preferred stock and could be required by law to sell a portion of our investments to repay some debt or redeem some preferred stock when it is disadvantageous to do so, which could have a material adverse effect on our operations, and we may not be able to make distributions. The amount of leverage that we employ will depend on our investment adviser’s and our Board of Directors’ assessment of market and other factors at the time of any proposed borrowing. We cannot assure you that we will be able to obtain credit at all or on terms acceptable to us.

In addition, any debt facility into which we may enter would likely impose financial and operating covenants that restrict our business activities, including limitations that could hinder our ability to finance additional loans and investments or to make the distributions required to maintain our status as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code.

We may experience fluctuations in our quarterly results.

We could experience fluctuations in our quarterly operating results due to a number of factors, including our ability or inability to make investments that meet our investment criteria, the interest rate payable on the debt securities we acquire, the level of portfolio dividend and fee income, the level of our expenses, variations in and the timing of the recognition of realized and unrealized gains or losses, the degree to which we encounter competition in our markets and general economic conditions. As a result of these factors, results for any period should not be relied upon as being indicative of performance in future periods.

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Our Board of Directors is authorized to reclassify any unissued shares of common stock into one or more classes of preferred stock, which could convey special rights and privileges to its owners.

Under Maryland General Corporation Law and our charter, our Board of Directors is authorized to classify and reclassify any authorized but unissued shares of stock into one or more classes of stock, including preferred stock. Prior to issuance of shares of each class or series, the Board of Directors will be required by Maryland law and our charter to set the terms, preferences, conversion or other rights, voting powers, restrictions, limitations as to dividends or other distributions, qualifications and terms or conditions of redemption for each class or series. Thus, the Board of Directors could authorize the issuance of shares of preferred stock with terms and conditions which could have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing a transaction or a change in control that might involve a premium price for holders of our common stock or otherwise be in their best interest. The cost of any such reclassification would be borne by our common stockholders. Certain matters under the 1940 Act require the separate vote of the holders of any issued and outstanding preferred stock. For example, holders of preferred stock would vote separately from the holders of common stock on a proposal to cease operations as a registered closed-end management investment company. In addition, the 1940 Act provides that holders of preferred stock are entitled to vote separately from holders of common stock to elect two preferred stock directors. We have issued preferred stock and may issue additional shares of preferred stock in the future. These effects, among others, could have an adverse effect on your investment in our common stock.

Our Board of Directors may change our operating policies and strategies without prior notice or stockholder approval, the effects of which may be adverse.

Our Board of Directors will have the authority to modify or waive our current operating policies, investment criteria and strategies, other than those that we have deemed to be fundamental, without prior notice and without stockholder approval. We cannot predict the effect any changes to our current operating policies, investment criteria and strategies would have on our business, net asset value, operating results and value of our stock. However, the effects might be adverse, which could negatively impact our ability to pay you dividends and cause you to lose all or part of your investment. See “Regulation as a Registered Closed-End Management Investment Company — Fundamental Investment Policies.”

We will be subject to corporate-level income tax if we are unable to maintain our RIC status under Subchapter M of the Code.

Although we have elected to be treated as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code beginning with our 2011 tax year and succeeding tax years, no assurance can be given that we will be able to continue to maintain RIC status. To obtain and maintain RIC tax treatment under the Code, we must meet the following annual distribution, income source and asset diversification requirements.

The annual distribution requirement for a RIC will be satisfied if we distribute to our stockholders on an annual basis at least 90% of our net ordinary income and realized net short-term capital gains in excess of realized net long-term capital losses, if any. Because we may use debt financing, we are subject to certain asset coverage ratio requirements under the 1940 Act and financial covenants under loan and credit agreements that could, under certain circumstances, restrict us from making distributions necessary to satisfy the distribution requirement. If we are unable to obtain cash from other sources, we could fail to qualify for RIC tax treatment and thus become subject to corporate-level income tax.

The income source requirement will be satisfied if we obtain at least 90% of our income for each year from dividends, interest, gains from the sale of stock or securities or similar sources.

The asset diversification requirement will be satisfied if we meet certain asset diversification requirements at the end of each quarter of our taxable year. Failure to meet those requirements may result in our having to dispose of certain investments quickly in order to prevent the loss of RIC status. Because most of our investments will be in CLO vehicles for which there will likely be no active public market, any such dispositions could be made at disadvantageous prices and could result in substantial losses.

If we fail to qualify for RIC tax treatment for any reason and remain or become subject to corporate income tax, the resulting corporate taxes could substantially reduce our net assets, the amount of income available for distribution and the amount of our distributions.

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There is a risk that our stockholders may not receive distributions or that our distributions may not grow or may be reduced over time, including on a per share basis as a result of the dilutive effects of this offering.

We intend to make distributions on a quarterly basis to our stockholders out of assets legally available for distribution. We cannot assure you that we will achieve investment results that will allow us to make a specified level of cash distributions or year-to-year increases in cash distributions. In addition, due to the asset coverage test applicable to us as a registered closed-end management investment company, we may be limited in our ability to make distributions. See “Regulation as a Registered Closed-End Management Investment Company.”

We may have difficulty paying our required distributions if we recognize income before or without receiving cash representing such income.

For federal income tax purposes, we will include in income certain amounts that we have not yet received in cash, such as original issue discount or market discount, which may arise if we acquire a debt security at a significant discount to par. Such discounts will be included in income before we receive any corresponding cash payments. We also may be required to include in income certain other amounts that we will not receive in cash.

Since, in certain cases, we may recognize income before or without receiving cash representing such income, we may have difficulty meeting the annual distribution requirement necessary to maintain RIC tax treatment under the Code. In addition, since our incentive fee is payable on our income recognized, rather than cash received, we may be required to pay advisory fees on income before or without receiving cash representing such income. Accordingly, we may have to sell some of our investments at times and/or at prices we would not consider advantageous, raise additional debt or equity capital or forgo new investment opportunities for this purpose. If we are not able to obtain cash from other sources, we may fail to qualify for RIC tax treatment and thus become subject to corporate-level income tax. For additional discussion regarding the tax implications of a RIC, please see “Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations — Taxation as a Regulated Investment Company.”

We may in the future choose to pay dividends in our own stock, in which case you may be required to pay tax in excess of the cash you receive.

We may distribute taxable dividends that are payable in cash or shares of our common stock at the election of each stockholder. Under certain applicable provision of the Code and the Treasury regulations, distributions payable in cash or in shares of stock at the election of stockholders are treated as taxable dividends. The Internal Revenue Service has issued private rulings indicating that this rule will apply even where the total amount of cash that may be distributed is limited to no more than 20% of the total distribution. Under these rulings, if too many stockholders elect to receive their distributions in cash, each such stockholder would receive a pro rata share of the total cash to be distributed and would receive the remainder of their distribution in shares of stock. If we decide to make any distributions consistent with these rulings that are payable in part in our stock, taxable stockholders receiving such dividends will be required to include the full amount of the dividend (whether received in cash, our stock, or combination thereof) as ordinary income (or as long-term capital gain to the extent such distribution is properly reported as a capital gain dividend) to the extent of our current and accumulated earnings and profits for United States federal income tax purposes. As a result, a U.S. stockholder may be required to pay tax with respect to such dividends in excess of any cash received. If a U.S. stockholder sells the stock it receives as a dividend in order to pay this tax, the sales proceeds may be less than the amount included in income with respect to the dividend, depending on the market price of our stock at the time of the sale. Furthermore, with respect to non-U.S. stockholders, we may be required to withhold U.S. tax with respect to such dividends, including in respect of all or a portion of such dividend that is payable in stock. In addition, if a significant number of our stockholders determine to sell shares of our stock in order to pay taxes owed on dividends, it may put downward pressure on the trading price of our stock.

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Changes in laws or regulations governing our operations may adversely affect our business or cause us to alter our business strategy.

We, the CLO vehicles in which we intend to invest, and the portfolio companies whose securities are held by such CLO vehicles will be subject to applicable local, state and federal laws and regulations, including, without limitation, federal immigration laws and regulations. New legislation may be enacted or new interpretations, rulings or regulations could be adopted, including those governing the types of investments we are permitted to make, any of which could harm us and our stockholders, potentially with retroactive effect. Additionally, any changes to the laws and regulations governing our operations may cause us to alter our investment strategy in order to avail ourselves of new or different opportunities. Such changes could result in material differences to the strategies and plans set forth herein and may result in our investment focus shifting from the areas of expertise of our investment adviser’s senior investment team to other types of investments in which the investment team may have less expertise or little or no experience. Thus, any such changes, if they occur, could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and the value of your investment.

We incur significant costs as a result of being a publicly traded company.

As a publicly traded company, we incur legal, accounting and other expenses, including costs associated with the periodic reporting requirements applicable to a company whose securities are registered under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act, as well as additional corporate governance requirements, including requirements under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, and other rules implemented by the SEC.

A disruption or downturn in the capital markets and the credit markets could impair our ability to raise capital and negatively affect our business.

As a registered closed-end management company, we seek to maintain our ability to raise additional capital for investment purposes. Without sufficient access to the capital markets or credit markets, we may not be able to pursue new business opportunities. Disruptive conditions in the financial industry and the impact of new legislation in response to those conditions could restrict our business operations and could adversely impact our results of operations and financial condition.

Our ability to grow our business could be impaired by an inability to access the capital markets or to enter into new credit facilities. At various times over the past three years, reflecting concern about the stability of the financial markets, many lenders and institutional investors have reduced or ceased providing funding to borrowers. This market disruption and tightening of credit has led to increased market volatility and widespread reduction of business activity generally. If we are unable to raise additional equity capital or consummate new credit facilities on terms that are acceptable to us, we may not be able to initiate significant originations.

These situations may arise due to circumstances that we may be unable to control, such as access to the credit markets, a severe decline in the value of the U.S. dollar, a further economic downturn or an operational problem that affects third parties or us, and could materially harm our business. Even if such conditions have improved broadly and significantly over the short-term, adverse conditions in particular sectors of the financial markets could adversely impact our business over the long-term.

We may be more susceptible than a diversified fund to being adversely affected by any single corporate, economic, political or regulatory occurrence.

We are classified as “non-diversified” under the 1940 Act. As a result, we can invest a greater portion of our assets in obligations of a single issuer than a “diversified” fund. We may therefore be more susceptible than a diversified fund to being adversely affected by any single corporate, economic, political or regulatory occurrence. We intend to continue to qualify as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code, and thus we intend to satisfy the diversification requirements of Subchapter M, including its less stringent diversification requirements that apply to the percentage of our total assets that are represented by cash and cash items (including receivables), U.S. government securities, the securities of other regulated investment companies and certain other securities.

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Terrorist attacks, acts of war or natural disasters may affect any market for our common stock, impact the businesses in which we invest and harm our business, operating results and financial condition.

Terrorist acts, acts of war or natural disasters may disrupt our operations, as well as the operations of the businesses in which we intend to invest. Such acts have created, and continue to create, economic and political uncertainties and have contributed to global economic instability. Future terrorist activities, military or security operations, or natural disasters could further weaken the domestic/global economies and create additional uncertainties, which may negatively impact the businesses in which we invest either directly or indirectly and, in turn, could have a material adverse impact on our business, operating results and financial condition. Losses from terrorist attacks and natural disasters are generally uninsurable.

Risks Related to Our Investments

Our equity investment distributions from CLO vehicles will likely be materially reduced if three month LIBOR increases.

An increase in LIBOR would materially increase the CLO vehicles’ financing costs. Since most of the collateral positions within the CLO investments have LIBOR floors, there may not be corresponding increases in investment income (if LIBOR increases but stays below the LIBOR floor rate of such investments) resulting in materially smaller distribution payments to the equity investors.

To illustrate the potential impact of a change in the underlying interest rate on our total estimated taxable income as it pertains to our CLO investments, we have assumed a 1% increase in the underlying three-month LIBOR, and no other change in our CLO portfolio, or to any of the credit, spread, default rate or other factors, as of March 31, 2014. Under this analysis, we currently estimate the effect on total estimated taxable income to equal a decrease of approximately $14.0 million on an annualized basis, reflecting the portfolio assets held within these CLO vehicles which have implied floors that would be unaffected by a 1% change in the underlying interest rate, compared to the debt carried by those CLO vehicles which are at variable rates and which would be affected by a change in three-month LIBOR. Although management believes that this analysis is broadly indicative of our existing LIBOR sensitivity, it does not adjust for changes in any of the other assumptions that could effect the return on CLO equity investments, both positively and negatively (and which could accompany changes to the three-month LIBOR rate), such as default rates, recovery rates, prepayment rates, reinvestment rates, and other factors that could affect the net increase (or decrease) in net assets resulting from operations. Accordingly, it is highly probable that actual results would differ materially from the results under this hypothetical analysis.

We may in the future hedge against interest rate fluctuations by using hedging instruments such as futures, options and forward contracts. While hedging activities may insulate us against adverse changes in interest rates, they may also limit our ability to participate in the benefits of lower interest rates with respect to the investments in our portfolio with fixed interest rates.

Our investments in CLO vehicles may be riskier and less transparent to us and our stockholders than direct investments in the underlying companies.

We have initially invested principally in equity and junior debt tranches issued by CLO vehicles. Generally, there may be less information available to us regarding the underlying debt investments held by such CLO vehicles than if we had invested directly in the debt of the underlying companies. As a result, our stockholders will not know the details of the underlying securities of the CLO vehicles in which we will invest. Our CLO investments will also be subject to the risk of leverage associated with the debt issued by such CLOs and the repayment priority of senior debt holders in such CLO vehicles.

The accounting and tax implications of such investments are complicated. In particular, reported earnings from the equity tranche investments of these CLO vehicles are recorded under generally accepted accounting principles based upon a constant yield calculation. Current taxable earnings on these investments, however, will generally not be determinable until after the end of the fiscal year of each individual CLO vehicle that ends within the Company’s fiscal year, even though the investments are generating cash flow. In general, the tax treatment of these investments may result in higher distributable earnings in the early years and a capital loss at maturity, while for reporting purposes the totality of cash flows are reflected in a constant yield to maturity.

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Our portfolio of investments may lack diversification among CLO vehicles which may subject us to a risk of significant loss if one or more of these CLO vehicles experience a high level of defaults on its underlying Senior Loans.

Our portfolio may hold investments in a limited number of CLO vehicles. Beyond the asset diversification requirements associated with our qualification as a RIC under the Code, we will not have fixed guidelines for diversification, we will not have any limitations on the ability to invest in any one CLO vehicle, and our investments may be concentrated in relatively few CLO vehicles. As our portfolio is less diversified than the portfolios of some larger funds, we are more susceptible to failure if one or more of the CLO vehicles in which we are invested experiences a high level of defaults on its underlying Senior Loans. Similarly, the aggregate returns we realize may be significantly adversely affected if a small number of investments perform poorly or if we need to write down the value of any one investment.

The Senior Loan portfolios of the CLO vehicles in which we invest may be concentrated in a limited number of industries or borrowers, which may subject those vehicles, and in turn us, to a risk of significant loss if there is a downturn in a particular industry in which a number of a CLO vehicle’s investments are concentrated.

The CLO vehicles in which we invest may have Senior Loan portfolios that are concentrated in a limited number of industries or borrowers. A downturn in any particular industry or borrower in which a CLO vehicle is heavily invested may subject that vehicle, and in turn us, to a risk of significant loss and could significantly impact the aggregate returns we realize. If an industry in which a CLO vehicle is heavily invested suffers from adverse business or economic conditions, a material portion of our investment in that CLO vehicle could be affected adversely, which, in turn, could adversely affect our financial position and results of operations.

The CLO vehicles in which we invest will incur, or will have already incurred, debt that ranks senior to our investment.

We intend to invest primarily in equity and junior debt tranches issued by CLO vehicles. As a result, the CLO vehicles in which we invest will issue and sell or have already issued and sold debt tranches that will rank senior to the tranches in which we invest. By their terms, such tranches may entitle the holders to receive payment of interest or principal on or before the dates on which we are entitled to receive payments with respect to the tranches in which we invest. Also, in the event of insolvency, liquidation, dissolution, reorganization or bankruptcy of a CLO vehicle, holders of senior debt instruments would typically be entitled to receive payment in full before we receive any distribution. After repaying such senior creditors, such CLO vehicle may not have any remaining assets to use for repaying its obligation to us. In the case of tranches ranking equally with the tranches in which we invest, we would have to share on an equal basis any distributions with other creditors holding such securities in the event of an insolvency, liquidation, dissolution, reorganization or bankruptcy of the relevant CLO vehicle. Therefore, we may not receive back the full amount of our investment in a CLO vehicle.

Failure by a CLO vehicle in which we are invested to satisfy certain tests will harm our operating results.

The failure by a CLO vehicle in which we invest to satisfy financial covenants, including with respect to adequate collateralization and/or interest coverage tests, could lead to a reduction in its payments to us. In the event that a CLO vehicle fails certain tests, senior debt holders may be entitled to additional payments that would, in turn, reduce the payments we would otherwise be entitled to receive. Separately, we may incur expenses to the extent necessary to seek recovery upon default or to negotiate new terms, which may include the waiver of certain financial covenants, with a defaulting CLO vehicle or any other investment we may make. If any of these occur, it could materially and adversely affect our operating results and cash flows.

Our financial results may be affected adversely if one or more of our significant equity or junior debt investments in such CLO vehicles defaults on its payment obligations or fails to perform as we expect.

Our portfolio will consist primarily of equity and junior debt investments in CLO vehicles, which involves a number of significant risks. CLO vehicles are typically very highly levered (10-14 times), and therefore the junior debt and equity tranches that we will invest in are subject to a higher degree of risk of

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total loss. In particular, investors in CLO vehicles indirectly bear risks of the underlying debt investments held by such CLO vehicles. We will generally have the right to receive payments only from the CLO vehicles, and will generally not have direct rights against the underlying borrowers or the entity that sponsored the CLO vehicle. While the CLO vehicles we have initially targeted generally enable the investor to acquire interests in a pool of Senior Loans without the expenses associated with directly holding the same investments, we will generally pay a proportionate share of the CLO vehicles’ administrative and other expenses. Although it is difficult to predict whether the prices of indices and securities underlying CLO vehicles will rise or fall, these prices (and, therefore, the prices of the CLO vehicles) will be influenced by the same types of political and economic events that affect issuers of securities and capital markets generally.

The interests we intend to acquire in CLO vehicles will likely be thinly traded or have only a limited trading market. CLO vehicles are typically privately offered and sold, even in the secondary market. As a result, investments in CLO vehicles may be characterized as illiquid securities. In addition to the general risks associated with investing in debt securities, CLO vehicles carry additional risks, including, but not limited to: (i) the possibility that distributions from collateral securities will not be adequate to make interest or other payments; (ii) the quality of the collateral may decline in value or default; (iii) the fact that our investments in CLO tranches will likely be subordinate to other senior classes of note tranches thereof; and (iv) the complex structure of the security may not be fully understood at the time of investment and may produce disputes with the CLO vehicle or unexpected investment results.

Investments in structured vehicles, including equity and junior debt instruments issued by CLO vehicles, involve risks, including credit risk and market risk. Changes in interest rates and credit quality may cause significant price fluctuations. Additionally, changes in the underlying Senior Loans held by a CLO vehicle may cause payments on the instruments we hold to be reduced, either temporarily or permanently. Structured investments, particularly the subordinated interests in which we invest, are less liquid than many other types of securities and may be more volatile than the Senior Loans underlying the CLO vehicles we target.

Investing in CLO vehicles, Senior Loans and other high-yield corporate credits involves a variety of risks, any of which may adversely impact our performance.

Investment Risk .  An investment in our securities is subject to investment risk, including the possible loss of your entire investment. An investment in our securities represents an indirect investment in the portfolio of equity and junior tranches issued by CLO vehicles and other securities owned by us, and the value of these securities may fluctuate, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. At any point in time an investment in our securities may be worth less than the original amount invested, even after taking into account distributions paid by us and the ability of shareholders to reinvest dividends. Because of their security features, we believe that certain Senior Loans that are experiencing, or are more likely to experience financial difficulty may represent attractive investment opportunities. We may invest in certain Senior Loans of borrowers that have filed for bankruptcy protection. Because of the security provided in certain Senior Loans, we believe that we may be able to recover more of our investment in certain defaulted Senior Loans than would be the case for some other types of defaulted debt securities. Nevertheless, there is no assurance that the sale of collateral (which was pledged against the Senior Loan) would raise enough cash to satisfy the borrower’s obligation or that the collateral can or will be liquidated.

Market Risk .  Market risk is the risk that the fair value or future cash flows of a financial instrument will fluctuate because of changes in market prices and includes interest rate risk, foreign currency risk and “other price risks”, such as index price risk. We may use derivative instruments to hedge the investment portfolio against currency risks. Our investments in CLO vehicles typically have no significant assets other than the collateral. Accordingly, payments on the equity and junior debt instruments we intend to initially target are payable solely from the cash flows from the collateral, net of all management fees and other expenses. Quarterly distributions or interest payments to us as a holder of equity or junior debt instruments, respectively, will only be made after payments due on any outstanding senior debt tranches have been made in full for such quarter.

Rating Risk .  Rating agencies, including Moody’s and Standard and Poor’s, have and may continue to downgrade the tranches of CLO vehicles that we are targeting and, therefore, these investments may be seen as riskier than they were previously thought to be. We cannot assure you that the CLO vehicles in which we

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invest, or the tranches of those CLO vehicles that we hold, will not experience downgrades. To the extent our portfolio experiences such downgrades, the value of our investments, and our ability to liquidate such investments, would likely be impaired. A significant impairment of any of our investments may have a material adverse effect on our financial results and operations.

Interest Rate Risk .  Our investments have initially been focused on investments in equity and junior debt tranches issued by CLO vehicles. Our investments have some exposure to interest rate risk and our investments in equity tranches of CLO vehicles have dollar-for-dollar interest rate risk on the equity portion. We expect to have less significant interest rate-related fluctuations in our net asset value per share than investment companies investing primarily in fixed income securities. When interest rates decline, the value of a fixed income portfolio can normally be expected to rise. Conversely, when interest rates rise, the value of a fixed income portfolio can normally be expected to decline. Currently, LIBOR rates are at historic lows. Although the income available to us will vary, we expect that our acquisition of interests in CLO vehicles may minimize fluctuations in our net asset value resulting from changes in market interest rates.

However, because floating or variable rates only reset periodically, changes in prevailing interest rates can be expected to cause some fluctuations in our net asset value. Similarly, a sudden and significant increase in market interest rates may cause a decline in our net asset value. In addition, any debt instruments that allow the borrower to opt between LIBOR-based interest rates and interest rates based on bank prime rates may have an impact on our net asset value. A material decline in our net asset value may impair our ability to maintain required levels of asset coverage, to the extent we elect to use debt to finance investments.

Credit Risk .  Credit risk is the risk that one or more investments in a portfolio will decline in price or fail to pay interest or principal when due because the issuer of the security experiences a decline in its financial condition. While a senior position in the capital structure of a corporate borrower may provide some protection to the CLO vehicles in which we invest, losses or other reductions in collateral may still occur in the portfolios of such CLO vehicles because the market value of such loans is affected by the creditworthiness of borrowers and by general economic and specific industry conditions. As we invest in equity and junior debt tranches of CLO vehicles, we are exposed to a greater amount of credit risk than a fund which invests in senior debt or investment grade securities. The prices of primarily non-investment grade securities are more sensitive to negative developments, such as a decline in a CLO vehicle’s collateral or cash flows or a general economic downturn, than are the prices of more senior debt securities. Securities of below investment grade quality are predominantly speculative with respect to the issuer’s capacity to pay interest and repay principal when due and therefore involve a greater risk of default. We will typically be in a first loss or subordinated position with respect to realized losses on the collateral of each investment we make in a CLO vehicle. The leveraged nature of the CLO vehicle, in particular, magnifies the adverse impact of collateral defaults. In addition, we may purchase participations in leveraged corporate loans. Such participations have rights that are more limited than the rights provided under assignments. In a participation the contractual relationship is typically with the lender selling the participation, but not with the borrower. As a result, a participant assumes the credit risk of the lender selling the participation in addition to the credit risk of the borrower. In the event of the insolvency of the lender selling the participation, a participant may be treated as a general creditor of the lender and may not have a senior claim to the lender’s interest in the Senior Loan.

Liquidity Risk .  Liquidity risk is defined as the risk that we may not be able to settle or meet our obligations on time or at a reasonable price. We may invest up to 100% of our portfolio in securities that are considered illiquid. “Illiquid securities” are securities which cannot be sold within seven days in the ordinary course of business at approximately the value used by us in determining our net asset value. We may not be able to readily dispose of such securities at prices that approximate those at which we could sell such securities if they were more widely-traded and, as a result of such illiquidity, we may have to sell other investments or engage in borrowing transactions to raise cash to meet our obligations. Limited liquidity can also affect the market price of securities, thereby adversely affecting our net asset value and ability to make dividend distributions. Some instruments issued by CLO vehicles may not be readily marketable and may be subject to restrictions on resale. Securities issued by CLO vehicles are generally not listed on any U.S. national securities exchange and no active trading market may exist for the securities in which we invest. Although a secondary market may exist for our investments, the market for our investments may be subject to irregular trading activity, wide bid/ask spreads and extended trade settlement periods. As a result, these types

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of investments may be more difficult to value. In addition, we believe that ownership of CLO equity and junior debt instruments has generally been distributed across a wide range of holders, some of whom we believe may continue to face near- to intermediate-term liquidity issues. Further, we believe that larger institutional investors with sufficient resources to source, analyze and negotiate the purchase of these assets may refrain from purchases of the size that we are targeting, thereby reducing the prospective investor population, which would limit our ability to sell our position in a CLO vehicle if we choose to or need to do so. We have no limitation on the amount of our assets which may be invested in securities that are not readily marketable or are subject to restrictions on resale. Further, Senior Loans generally are not listed on any national securities exchange or automated quotation system and no active trading market exists for many Senior Loans. As a result, many Senior Loans are illiquid, meaning that we may not be able to sell them quickly at a fair price. The market for illiquid securities is more volatile than the market for liquid securities.

Investments in foreign securities may involve significant risks in addition to the risks inherent in U.S. investments.

Our investment strategy involves investments in securities issued by foreign entities, including foreign CLO vehicles. Investing in foreign entities may expose us to additional risks not typically associated with investing in U.S. issues. These risks include changes in exchange control regulations, political and social instability, expropriation, imposition of foreign taxes, less liquid markets and less available information than is generally the case in the United States, higher transaction costs, less government supervision of exchanges, brokers and issuers, less developed bankruptcy laws, difficulty in enforcing contractual obligations, lack of uniform accounting and auditing standards and greater price volatility. Further, we, and the CLO vehicles in which we invest, may have difficulty enforcing creditor’s rights in foreign jurisdictions. In addition, the underlying companies of the CLO vehicles in which we invest may be foreign, which may create greater exposure for us to foreign economic developments.

Although we expect that most of our investments will be U.S. dollar-denominated, any investments denominated in a foreign currency will be subject to the risk that the value of a particular currency will change in relation to one or more other currencies. Among the factors that may affect currency values are trade balances, the level of short-term interest rates, differences in relative values of similar assets in different currencies, long-term opportunities for investment and capital appreciation, and political developments. We may employ hedging techniques to minimize these risks, but we can offer no assurance that we will, in fact, hedge currency risk, or that if we do, such strategies will be effective.

We may expose ourselves to risks if we engage in hedging transactions.

If we engage in hedging transactions, we may expose ourselves to risks associated with such transactions. We may utilize instruments such as forward contracts, currency options and interest rate swaps, caps, collars and floors to seek to hedge against fluctuations in the relative values of our portfolio positions from changes in currency exchange rates and market interest rates. Hedging against a decline in the values of our portfolio positions does not eliminate the possibility of fluctuations in the values of such positions or prevent losses if the values of such positions decline. However, such hedging can establish other positions designed to gain from those same developments, thereby offsetting the decline in the value of such portfolio positions. Such hedging transactions may also limit the opportunity for gain if the values of the underlying portfolio positions increase. It may not be possible to hedge against an exchange rate or interest rate fluctuation that is so generally anticipated that we are not able to enter into a hedging transaction at an acceptable price. Moreover, for a variety of reasons, we may not seek to establish a perfect correlation between such hedging instruments and the portfolio holdings being hedged. Any such imperfect correlation may prevent us from achieving the intended hedge and expose us to risk of loss. In addition, it may not be possible to hedge fully or perfectly against currency fluctuations affecting the value of securities denominated in non-U.S. currencies because the value of those securities is likely to fluctuate as a result of factors not related to currency fluctuations.

Any unrealized losses we experience on our portfolio may be an indication of future realized losses, which could reduce our income available for distribution.

As a registered closed-end management investment company, we are required to carry our investments at market value or, if no market value is ascertainable, at the fair value as determined in good faith by our Board of Directors. Decreases in the market values or fair values of our investments will be recorded as unrealized

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depreciation. Any unrealized losses in our portfolio could be an indication of an issuer’s inability to meet its repayment obligations to us with respect to the affected investments. This could result in realized losses in the future and ultimately in reductions of our income available for distribution in future periods.

Our investments in CLO vehicles may be subject to special anti-deferral provisions that could result in us incurring tax or recognizing income prior to receiving cash distributions related to such income.

We anticipate that the CLO vehicles in which we invest may constitute “passive foreign investment companies” (“PFICs”). Because we acquire shares in PFICs (including equity tranche investments in CLO vehicles that are PFICs), we may be subject to federal income tax on a portion of any “excess distribution” or gain from the disposition of such shares even if such income is distributed as a taxable dividend by us to our stockholders. Certain elections may be available to mitigate or eliminate such tax on excess distributions, but such elections (if available) will generally require us to recognize our share of the PFIC’s income for each year regardless of whether we receive any distributions from such PFIC. We must nonetheless distribute such income to maintain our status as a RIC.

If we hold more than 10% of the shares in a foreign corporation that is treated as a controlled foreign corporation (“CFC”) (including equity tranche investments in a CLO vehicle treated as a CFC), we may be treated as receiving a deemed distribution (taxable as ordinary income) each year from such foreign corporation in an amount equal to our pro rata share of the corporation’s income for the tax year (including both ordinary earnings and capital gains). If we are required to include such deemed distributions from a CFC in our income, we will be required to distribute such income to maintain our RIC status regardless of whether or not the CFC makes an actual distribution during such year.

If we are required to include amounts in income prior to receiving distributions representing such income, we may have to sell some of our investments at times and/or at prices we would not consider advantageous, raise additional debt or equity capital or forgo new investment opportunities for this purpose. If we are not able to obtain cash from other sources, we may fail to qualify for RIC tax treatment and thus become subject to corporate-level income tax. For additional discussion regarding the tax implications of a RIC, see “Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations — Taxation as a Regulated Investment Company.”

If a CLO vehicle in which we invest fails to comply with certain U.S. tax disclosure requirements, such CLO may be subject to withholding requirements that could materially and adversely affect our operating results and cash flows.

Legislation commonly referred to as the “Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act,” or “FATCA,” imposes a withholding tax of 30% on payments of U.S. source interest and dividends paid after June 30, 2014, or gross proceeds from the disposition of an instrument that produces U.S. source interest or dividends paid after December 31, 2016, to certain non-U.S. entities, including certain non-U.S. financial institutions and investment funds, unless such non-U.S. entity complies with certain reporting requirements regarding its United States account holders and its United States owners. Most CLO vehicles in which we invest will be treated as non-U.S. financial entities for this purpose, and therefore will be required to comply with these reporting requirements to avoid the 30% withholding. If a CLO vehicle in which we invest fails to properly comply with these reporting requirements, it could reduce the amounts available to distribute to equity and junior debt holders in such CLO vehicle, which could materially and adversely affect our operating results and cash flows.

Uncertainty relating to the LIBOR calculation process may adversely affect the value of our portfolio of the LIBOR-indexed, floating-rate debt securities.

Concerns have been publicized that some of the member banks surveyed by the British Bankers’ Association (“BBA”) in connection with the calculation of LIBOR across a range of maturities and currencies may have been under-reporting or otherwise manipulating the inter-bank lending rate applicable to them in order to profit on their derivatives positions or to avoid an appearance of capital insufficiency or adverse reputational or other consequences that may have resulted from reporting inter-bank lending rates higher than those they actually submitted. A number of BBA member banks have entered into settlements with their regulators and law enforcement agencies with respect to alleged manipulation of LIBOR, and investigations by regulators and governmental authorities in various jurisdictions are ongoing.

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Actions by the BBA, regulators or law enforcement agencies may result in changes to the manner in which LIBOR is determined. Uncertainty as to the nature of such potential changes may adversely affect the market for LIBOR-based securities, including our portfolio of LIBOR-indexed, floating-rate debt securities. In addition, any further changes or reforms to the determination or supervision of LIBOR may result in a sudden or prolonged increase or decrease in reported LIBOR, which could have an adverse impact on the market for LIBOR-based securities or the value of our portfolio of LIBOR-indexed, floating-rate debt securities.

Risks Relating to an Investment in our Securities

Common shares of closed-end management investment companies, including Oxford Lane Capital, have in the past frequently traded at discounts to their net asset values, and we cannot assure you that the market price of shares of our common stock will not decline below our net asset value per share.

Common shares of closed-end management investment companies have in the past frequently traded at discounts to their net asset values and our stock may also be discounted in the market. This characteristic of closed-end management investment companies is separate and distinct from the risk that our net asset value per share may decline. We cannot predict whether shares of our common stock will trade above, at or below our net asset value. The risk of loss associated with this characteristic of closed-end management investment companies may be greater for investors expecting to sell shares of common stock purchased in the offering soon after the offering. In addition, if our common stock trades below its net asset value, we will generally not be able to sell additional shares of our common stock to the public at its market price without first obtaining the approval of our stockholders (including our unaffiliated stockholders) and our independent directors for such issuance.

Our common stock price may be volatile and may decrease substantially.

The trading price of our common stock may fluctuate substantially. The price of our common stock that will prevail in the market after this offering may be higher or lower than the price you pay, depending on many factors, some of which are beyond our control and may not be directly related to our operating performance. These factors include, but are not limited to, the following:

• price and volume fluctuations in the overall stock market from time to time;
• investor demand for our shares;
• significant volatility in the market price and trading volume of securities of registered closed-end management investment companies or other companies in our sector, which are not necessarily related to the operating performance of these companies;
• changes in regulatory policies or tax guidelines with respect to RICs or registered closed-end management investment companies;
• failure to continue to qualify as a RIC, or the loss of RIC status;
• any shortfall in revenue or net income or any increase in losses from levels expected by investors or securities analysts;
• changes, or perceived changes, in the value of our portfolio investments;
• departures of any members of Oxford Lane Management’s senior investment team;
• operating performance of companies comparable to us; or
• general economic conditions and trends and other external factors.

In the past, following periods of volatility in the market price of a company’s securities, securities class action litigation has often been brought against that company. Due to the potential volatility of our stock price, we may become the target of securities litigation in the future. Securities litigation could result in substantial costs and divert management’s attention and resources from our business.

We cannot assure you that we will be able to successfully deploy the proceeds of any offering conducted pursuant to this prospectus within the timeframe we have contemplated.

We currently anticipate that substantially all of the net proceeds of any offering conducted pursuant to this prospectus will be invested in accordance with our investment objective within approximately one to three

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months after the consummation of such offering. We cannot assure you, however, that we will be able to locate a sufficient number of suitable investment opportunities to allow us to successfully deploy substantially all of the net proceeds of any such offering in that timeframe. To the extent we are unable to invest substantially all of the net proceeds of any such offering within our contemplated timeframe after the completion of such offering, our investment income, and in turn our results of operations, will likely be materially adversely affected.

We will have broad discretion over the use of proceeds of any offering conducted pursuant to this prospectus and will use proceeds in part to satisfy operating expenses.

We will have significant flexibility in applying the proceeds of any offering conducted pursuant to this prospectus and may use the net proceeds from any such offering in ways with which you may not agree, or for purposes other than those contemplated at the time of such offering. We will also pay operating expenses, and may pay other expenses such as due diligence expenses of potential new investments, from net proceeds. Our ability to achieve our investment objective may be limited to the extent that net proceeds of any such offering, pending full investment, are used to pay operating expenses.

Your interest in us may be diluted if you do not fully exercise your subscription rights in any rights offering.

In the event we issue subscription rights to purchase shares of our common stock, stockholders who do not fully exercise their rights should expect that they will, at the completion of the offer, own a smaller proportional interest in us than would otherwise be the case if they fully exercised their rights. We cannot state precisely the amount of any such dilution in share ownership because we do not know at this time what proportion of the shares will be purchased as a result of the offer.

In addition, if the subscription price is less than our net asset value per share, then our stockholders would experience an immediate dilution of the aggregate net asset value of their shares as a result of the offer. The amount of any decrease in net asset value is not predictable because it is not known at this time what the subscription price and net asset value per share will be on the expiration date of the rights offering or what proportion of the shares will be purchased as a result of the offer. Such dilution could be substantial.

If we issue additional preferred stock, the net asset value and market value of our common stock will likely become more volatile.

We cannot assure you that the issuance of additional preferred stock would result in a higher yield or return to the holders of the common stock. The issuance of additional preferred stock would likely cause the net asset value and market value of the common stock to become more volatile. If the dividend rate on the preferred stock were to approach the net rate of return on our investment portfolio, the benefit of leverage to the holders of the common stock would be reduced. If the dividend rate on the preferred stock were to exceed the net rate of return on our portfolio, the leverage would result in a lower rate of return to the holders of common stock than if we had not issued preferred stock. Any decline in the net asset value of our investments would be borne entirely by the holders of common stock. Therefore, if the market value of our portfolio were to decline, the leverage would result in a greater decrease in net asset value to the holders of common stock than if we were not leveraged through the issuance of preferred stock. This greater net asset value decrease would also tend to cause a greater decline in the market price for the common stock. We might be in danger of failing to maintain the required asset coverage of the preferred stock or of losing our ratings, if any, on the preferred stock or, in an extreme case, our current investment income might not be sufficient to meet the dividend requirements on the preferred stock. In order to counteract such an event, we might need to liquidate investments in order to fund a redemption of some or all of the preferred stock. In addition, we would pay (and the holders of common stock would bear) all costs and expenses relating to the issuance and ongoing maintenance of the preferred stock, including higher advisory fees if our total return exceeds the dividend rate on the preferred stock. Holders of preferred stock may have different interests than holders of common stock and may at times have disproportionate influence over our affairs.

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Any amounts that we use to service our indebtedness or preferred dividends, or that we use to redeem our preferred stock, will not be available for distributions to our common stockholders.

Although we have no current intention to do so, we may in the future issue debt securities or additional shares of preferred stock and/or borrow money from banks or other financial institutions, which we refer to collectively as “senior securities,” up to the maximum amount permitted by the 1940 Act. Under the provisions of the 1940 Act, we will be permitted, as a registered closed-end management investment company, to issue senior securities representing indebtedness so long as our asset coverage ratio with respect thereto, defined under the 1940 Act as the ratio of our gross assets (less all liabilities and indebtedness not represented by senior securities) to our outstanding senior securities representing indebtedness, is at least 300% after each issuance of such senior securities. In addition, we will be permitted to issue additional shares of preferred stock so long as our asset coverage ratio with respect thereto, defined under the 1940 Act as the ratio of our gross assets (less all liabilities and indebtedness not represented by senior securities) to our outstanding senior securities representing indebtedness, plus the aggregate involuntary liquidation preference of our outstanding preferred stock, is at least 200% after each issuance of such preferred stock. If the value of our assets declines, we may be unable to satisfy these tests. If that happens, we may be required to sell a portion of our investments and, depending on the nature of our leverage, repay a portion of our indebtedness or redeem outstanding shares of preferred stock, in each case at a time when doing so may be disadvantageous. Any amounts that we use to service our indebtedness or preferred dividends, or that we use to redeem our preferred stock, would not be available for distributions to our common stockholders.

Our common stock is subject to a risk of subordination relative to holders of our debt instruments and holders of our preferred stock.

Rights of holders of our common stock are subordinated to the rights of holders of our indebtedness and to the rights of holders of our preferred stock. Therefore, dividends, distributions and other payments to holders of our common stock in liquidation or otherwise may be subject to prior payments due to the holders of our indebtedness or our preferred stock. In addition, under some circumstances the 1940 Act may provide debt holders with voting rights that are superior to the voting rights of holders of our equity securities.

Holders of our preferred stock have the right to elect members of our Board of Directors and class voting rights on certain matters.

Except as otherwise provided in our Articles of Amendment and Restatement, as amended by the Articles Supplementary, or as otherwise required by law, (1) each holder of our preferred stock is entitled to one vote for each share of preferred stock held by such holder on each matter submitted to a vote of our stockholders and (2) the holders of all outstanding preferred stock and common stock will vote together as a single class; provided that holders of preferred stock, voting separately as a class, will elect two of our directors and will be entitled to elect a majority of our directors if we fail to pay dividends on any outstanding shares of preferred stock in an amount equal to two full years of dividends and continuing during that period until we correct that failure. Preferred stock holders will also vote separately as a class on any matter that materially and adversely affects any preference, right or power of holders of preferred stock.

Provisions of the Maryland General Corporation Law and of our charter and bylaws could deter takeover attempts and have an adverse impact on the price of our common stock.

The Maryland General Corporation Law and our charter and bylaws contain provisions that may discourage, delay or make more difficult a change in control of Oxford Lane Capital or the removal of our directors. We are subject to the Maryland Business Combination Act, subject to any applicable requirements of the 1940 Act. Our Board of Directors has adopted a resolution exempting from the Business Combination Act any business combination between us and any other person, subject to prior approval of such business combination by our Board of Directors, including approval by a majority of our independent Directors. If the resolution exempting business combinations is repealed or our Board of Directors does not approve a business combination, the Business Combination Act may discourage third parties from trying to acquire control of us and increase the difficulty of consummating such an offer. Our bylaws exempt from the Maryland Control Share Acquisition Act acquisitions of our stock by any person. If we amend our bylaws to repeal the exemption from the Control Share Acquisition Act, the Control Share Acquisition Act also may make it more difficult for a third party to obtain control of us and increase the difficulty of consummating such a transaction.

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We have also adopted measures that may make it difficult for a third party to obtain control of us, including provisions of our charter classifying our Board of Directors in three classes serving staggered three-year terms, and authorizing our Board of Directors to classify or reclassify shares of our stock in one or more classes or series, to cause the issuance of additional shares of our stock, to amend our charter without stockholder approval and to increase or decrease the number of shares of stock that we have authority to issue. These provisions, as well as other provisions of our charter and bylaws, may delay, defer or prevent a transaction or a change in control that might otherwise be in the best interests of our stockholders.

You may not receive dividends or our dividends may decline or may not grow over time.

We cannot assure you that we will achieve investment results or maintain a tax status that will allow or require any specified level of cash distributions or year-to-year increases in cash distributions. In particular, our future dividends are dependent upon the investment income we receive on our portfolio investments. To the extent such investment income declines, our ability to pay future dividends may be harmed.

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CAUTIONARY STATEMENT REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This prospectus contains forward-looking statements that involve substantial risks and uncertainties. These forward-looking statements are not historical facts, but rather are based on current expectations, estimates and projections about Oxford Lane Capital Corp., our current and prospective portfolio investments, our industry, our beliefs, and our assumptions. Words such as “anticipates,” “expects,” “intends,” “plans,” “will,” “may,” “continue,” “believes,” “seeks,” “estimates,” “would,” “could,” “should,” “targets,” “projects,” and variations of these words and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements.

The forward-looking statements contained in this prospectus involve risks and uncertainties, including statements as to:

• our future operating results;
• our business prospects and the prospects of a CLO vehicle’s portfolio companies;
• the impact of investments that we expect to make;
• our contractual arrangements and relationships with third parties;
• the dependence of our future success on the general economy and its impact on the industries in which we invest;
• the ability of a CLO vehicle’s portfolio companies to achieve their objectives;
• our expected financings and investments;
• the adequacy of our cash resources and working capital; and
• the timing of cash flows, if any, from our investments.

These statements are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to risks, uncertainties, and other factors, some of which are beyond our control and difficult to predict and could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or forecasted in the forward-looking statements, including without limitation:

• an economic downturn could impair the ability of a CLO vehicle’s portfolio companies to continue to operate, which could lead to the loss of some or all of our investment in such CLO vehicle;
• a contraction of available credit and/or an inability to access the equity markets could impair our investment activities;
• interest rate volatility could adversely affect our results, particularly if we elect to use leverage as part of our investment strategy;
• currency fluctuations could adversely affect the results of our investments in foreign companies, particularly to the extent that we receive payments denominated in foreign currency rather than U.S. dollars; and
• the risks, uncertainties and other factors we identify in “Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this prospectus and in our filings with the SEC.

Although we believe that the assumptions on which these forward-looking statements are based are reasonable, any of those assumptions could prove to be inaccurate, and as a result, the forward-looking statements based on those assumptions also could be inaccurate. Important assumptions include our ability to originate new investments, certain margins and levels of profitability and the availability of additional capital. In light of these and other uncertainties, the inclusion of a projection or forward-looking statement in this prospectus should not be regarded as a representation by us that our plans and objectives will be achieved. These risks and uncertainties include those described or identified in “Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this prospectus. You should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which apply only as of the date of this prospectus. However, we will update this prospectus to reflect any material changes to the information contained herein. The forward-looking statements contained in this prospectus are excluded from the safe harbor protection provided by Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the “Securities Act.”

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USE OF PROCEEDS

We intend to use the net proceeds from the sale of our securities pursuant to this prospectus for acquiring investments in accordance with our investment objective and strategies described in this prospectus and for general working capital purposes. We may also pay operating expenses, including advisory and administrative fees and expenses, and may pay other expenses such as due diligence expenses of potential new investments, from the net proceeds of any offering conducted pursuant to this prospectus. We anticipate that substantially all of the net proceeds of any such offering will be used for the above purposes within approximately three months from the consummation of such offering, depending on the availability of appropriate investment opportunities consistent with our investment objective and market conditions. We cannot assure you we will achieve our targeted investment pace.

Pending such investments, we will invest the net proceeds primarily in cash, cash equivalents, U.S. government securities and other high-quality investments that mature in one year or less from the date of investment. The management fee payable by us will not be reduced while our assets are invested in such securities. See “Regulation as a Closed-End Investment Company — Temporary Investments” for additional information about temporary investments we may make while waiting to make longer-term investments in pursuit of our investment objective. The supplement to this prospectus relating to an offering conducted pursuant to this prospectus will more fully identify the use of the proceeds from such offering.

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PRICE RANGE OF COMMON STOCK AND DISTRIBUTIONS

Our common stock is traded on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol “OXLC.” The following table sets forth, for each fiscal quarter since our initial public offering, the net asset value (“NAV”) per share of our common stock, the high and low intraday sales prices for our common stock, such sales prices as a percentage of NAV per share and quarterly distributions per share.

Price Range
NAV (1) High Low Premium/Discount
of
High Sales Price to NAV (2)
Premium/Discount
of
Low Sales Price to NAV (2)
Distributions Per Share (3)
Fiscal 2015
First Quarter (through June 4, 2014) * $ 17.78 $ 16.51 * * $ 0.60
Fiscal 2014
Fourth Quarter $ 16.26 $ 19.18 $ 15.90 18 % (2 %) $ 0.70
Third Quarter $ 16.69 $ 17.70 $ 14.76 6 % (12 %) $ 0.55
Second Quarter $ 16.13 $ 16.75 $ 14.95 4 % (7 %) $ 0.55
First Quarter $ 15.71 $ 18.56 $ 15.15 18 % (4 %) $ 0.55
Fiscal 2013
Fourth Quarter $ 16.20 $ 16.30 $ 14.99 1 % (7 %) $ 0.55
Third Quarter $ 17.41 $ 16.80 $ 14.70 (4 %) (16 %) $ 0.55
Second Quarter $ 17.13 $ 16.79 $ 14.00 (2 %) (18 %) $ 0.55
First Quarter $ 14.60 $ 15.00 $ 13.49 3 % (8 %) $ 0.55

(1) Net asset value per share is determined as of the last day in the relevant quarter and therefore may not reflect the net asset value per share on the date of the high and low sales prices. The net asset values shown are based on outstanding shares at the end of each period.
(2) Calculated as the respective high or low intraday sales price divided by NAV.
(3) Represents the cash distributions, including dividends, dividends reinvested and returns of capital, if any, per share that we have declared on our common stock in the specified quarter.
* Not determinable at the time of filing.

On June 4, 2014, the last reported sales price of our common stock was $17.68 per share. As of June 4, 2014, we had 89 shareholders of record of our common stock.

Shares of closed-end management investment companies may trade at a market price that is less than the value of the net assets attributable to those shares. The possibility that our shares of common stock will trade at a discount from net asset value or at premiums that are unsustainable over the long term are separate and distinct from the risk that our net asset value will decrease. Since our initial public offering, shares of our common stock have traded at a discount and at a premium to the net assets attributable to those shares. It is not possible to predict whether the shares offered hereby will trade at, above, or below net asset value.

To the extent that we have income available, we intend to distribute quarterly dividends to our stockholders. Our quarterly dividends, if any, will be determined by our Board of Directors. Any dividends to our stockholders will be declared out of assets legally available for distribution. The following table reflects the cash distributions, including dividends, dividends reinvested and returns of capital, if any, per share that we have declared on our common stock to date:

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Date Declared Record Date Payment Date Amount (1)
Fiscal 2015
May 19, 2014 June 16, 2014 June 30, 2014 $ 0.60
Fiscal 2014
November 26, 2013 March 17, 2014 March 31, 2014 0.60
November 26, 2013 March 17, 2014 March 31, 2014 0.10 (2)
November 6, 2013 December 17, 2013 December 31, 2013 0.55
July 24, 2013 September 16, 2013 September 30, 2013 0.55
May 22, 2013 June 14, 2013 June 28, 2013 0.55
Total (2014) 2.35
Fiscal 2013
February 6, 2013 March 15, 2013 March 29, 2013 0.55
October 23, 2012 December 17, 2012 December 31, 2012 0.55
July 31, 2012 September 14, 2012 September 28, 2012 0.55
May 22, 2012 June 15, 2012 June 29, 2012 0.55
Total (2013) 2.20
Fiscal 2012
January 25, 2012 March 16, 2012 March 30, 2012 0.55
October 24, 2011 December 16, 2011 December 30, 2011 0.50
July 22, 2011 September 16, 2011 September 30, 2011 0.50
April 6, 2011 June 16, 2011 June 30, 2011 0.50
Total (2012) 2.05
Fiscal 2011
March 7, 2011 March 21, 2011 April 1, 2011 0.25
Total (2011) 0.25
$ 7.45

(1) All of our cash distributions to date were funded from net investment income, except approximately $0.07 per share and $0.40 per share of the distributions paid on June 29, 2012 and June 28, 2013, respectively, which were funded from long term capital gains. The tax characterization of cash distributions for the year ended March 31, 2014 will not be known until the tax return for that year is finalized.
(2) Represents a special dividend for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014.

For fiscal year 2014, we paid $1,344,083 and $2,638,151 in preferred dividends on the Series 2017 Term Preferred Shares and Series 2023 Term Preferred Shares, respectively. For fiscal 2013, we paid $459,222 in preferred dividends on the Series 2017 Term Preferred Shares.

For accounting purposes the distributions declared on our common stock for the fiscal periods ended March 31, 2013, 2012 and 2011 were in excess of the reported earnings. However, as a RIC, earnings and distributions are determined on a tax basis. Furthermore, taxable earnings are determined according to tax regulations and differ from reported income for accounting purposes. Therefore, for the fiscal periods ended March 31, 2013, 2012 and 2011, distributions were spilled-back for tax purposes in an amount equal to taxable earnings exceeded our distributions and there was no tax return of capital for these years. To the extent that taxable earnings for any fiscal year are less than the amount of the dividends paid during the year, there would be a tax return of capital to shareholders. Distributions in excess of current and accumulated taxable earnings and profits will generally not be taxable to the shareholders, because a tax return of capital represents a return of a portion of a shareholder’s original investment in our common stock to the extent of a shareholder’s basis in our stock. Generally, a tax return of capital will reduce an investor’s basis in our stock for federal tax purposes, which will result in the shareholder recognizing additional gain (or less loss) when the stock is sold. Assuming that a shareholder holds our stock as a capital asset, any such additional gain would be a capital gain. Shareholders should not assume that the source of all distributions is from our net profits and shareholders may periodically receive the payment of a dividend consisting of a return of capital.

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The tax character of any distributions will be determined after the end of the fiscal year. Tax matters are very complicated and the tax consequences to an investor of an investment in our shares will depend on the facts of its particular situation. We encourage investors to consult their own tax advisors regarding the specific consequences of such an investment, including tax reporting requirements, the applicability of federal, state, local and foreign tax laws, eligibility for the benefits of any applicable tax treaty and the effect of any possible changes in the tax laws.

We have elected to be treated, and intend to continue to qualify annually, as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code beginning with our 2011 taxable year. To maintain RIC tax treatment, we must, among other things, distribute at least 90% of our ordinary income and realized net short-term capital gains in excess of realized net long-term capital losses, if any. In order to avoid certain excise taxes imposed on RICs, we currently intend to distribute during each calendar year an amount at least equal to the sum of: (1) 98% of our ordinary income for the calendar year; (2) 98.2% of our capital gains in excess of capital losses for the one-year period ending on October 31 of the calendar year; and, (3) any ordinary income and net capital gains for preceding years that were not distributed during such years and on which we paid no federal income tax. In addition, although we currently intend to distribute realized net capital gains (i.e., net long term capital gains in excess of short term capital losses), if any, at least annually, we may in the future decide to retain such capital gains for investment and elect to treat such gains as deemed distributions to you. If this happens, you will be treated as if you had received an actual distribution of the capital gains we retain and reinvested the net after tax proceeds in us. In this situation, you would be eligible to claim a tax credit (or, in certain circumstances, a tax refund) equal to your allocable share of the tax we paid on the capital gains deemed distributed to you. See “Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations.” We can offer no assurance that we will achieve results that will permit the payment of any cash distributions and, to the extent that we issue senior securities, we will be prohibited from making distributions if doing so causes us to fail to maintain the asset coverage ratios stipulated by the 1940 Act or if distributions are limited by the terms of any of our borrowings.

Our current intention is to make any distributions in additional shares of our common stock under our dividend reinvestment plan out of assets legally available therefore, unless you elect to receive your dividends and/or long-term capital gains distributions in cash. See “Dividend Reinvestment Plan.” If you hold shares in the name of a broker or financial intermediary, you should contact the broker or financial intermediary regarding your election to receive distributions in cash. We can offer no assurance that we will achieve results that will permit the payment of any cash distributions and, if we issue senior securities, we will be prohibited from making distributions if doing so causes us to fail to maintain the asset coverage ratios stipulated by the 1940 Act or if distributions are limited by the terms of any of our borrowings.

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SENIOR SECURITIES

Information about our senior securities is shown in the following table as of the end of each fiscal year since our formation. The report of our independent registered public accounting firm covering the total amount of senior securities outstanding as of March 31, 2014 and 2013 is attached as an exhibit to the registration statement of which this prospectus is a part.

Total Amount Outstanding Exclusive of Treasury Securities (1) Asset
Coverage
Ratio
Per Unit (2)
Involuntary Liquidation Preference
Per Unit (3)
Average
Market
Value
Per Unit (4)
Year
Series 2017 Term Preferred Shares
2014 $ 15,811,250 3.99 $ 25 1.05
2013 $ 15,811,250 8.79 $ 25 1.03
2012 — — — —
2011 — — — —
Series 2023 Term Preferred Shares
2014 $ 65,744,250 3.99 $ 25 0.94
2013 — — — —
2012 — — — —
2011 — — — —

(1) Total amount of each class of senior securities outstanding at the end of the period presented.
(2) Asset coverage per unit is the ratio of the carrying value of our total consolidated assets, less all liabilities and indebtedness not represented by senior securities, to the aggregate amount of senior securities. Asset coverage per unit is expressed in terms of dollar amounts per share.
(3) The amount to which such class of senior security would be entitled upon the voluntary liquidation of the issuer in preference to any security junior to it.
(4) The Average Market Value Per Unit is calculated by taking the daily average closing price of the security for the respective period and dividing it by $25 per share to determine a unit price per share consistent with Asset Coverage Per Unit.

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BUSINESS

Overview

We are a non-diversified closed-end management investment company that has registered as an investment company under the 1940 Act. Our investment objective is to maximize our portfolio’s total return. We have initially implemented our investment objective by purchasing portions of equity and junior debt tranches of CLO vehicles. Substantially all of the CLO vehicles in which we may invest would be deemed to be investment companies under the 1940 Act but for the exceptions set forth in section 3(c)(1) or section 3(c)(7). Structurally, CLO vehicles are entities formed to originate and manage a portfolio of loans. The loans within the CLO vehicle are limited to loans which meet established credit criteria and are subject to concentration limitations in order to limit a CLO vehicle’s exposure to a single credit. A CLO vehicle is formed by raising various classes or “tranches” of debt (with the most senior tranches being rated “AAA” to the most junior tranches typically being rated “BB” or “B”) and equity. The CLO vehicles which we focus on are collateralized primarily by Senior Loans, and generally have very little or no exposure to real estate, mortgage loans or to pools of consumer-based debt, such as credit card receivables or auto loans. Our investment strategy also includes warehouse facilities, which are financing structures intended to aggregate loans that may be used to form the basis of a CLO vehicle. We may also invest, on an opportunistic basis, in other corporate credits of a variety of types. We expect that each of our investments will range in size from $5 million to $50 million, although the investment size may vary consistent with the size of our overall portfolio.

Distributions

The following table reflects the cash distributions, including dividends, dividends reinvested and returns of capital, if any, per share that we have declared on our common stock to date:

Date Declared Record Date Payment Date Amount (1)
Fiscal 2015
May 19, 2014 June 16, 2014 June 30, 2014 $ 0.60
Fiscal 2014
November 26, 2013 March 17, 2014 March 31, 2014 0.60
November 26, 2013 March 17, 2014 March 31, 2014 0.10 (2)
November 6, 2013 December 17, 2013 December 31, 2013 0.55
July 24, 2013 September 16, 2013 September 30, 2013 0.55
May 22, 2013 June 14, 2013 June 28, 2013 0.55
Total (2014) 2.35
Fiscal 2013
February 6, 2013 March 15, 2013 March 29, 2013 0.55
October 23, 2012 December 17, 2012 December 31, 2012 0.55
July 31, 2012 September 14, 2012 September 28, 2012 0.55
May 22, 2012 June 15, 2012 June 29, 2012 0.55
Total (2013) 2.20
Fiscal 2012
January 25, 2012 March 16, 2012 March 30, 2012 0.55
October 24, 2011 December 16, 2011 December 30, 2011 0.50
July 22, 2011 September 16, 2011 September 30, 2011 0.50
April 6, 2011 June 16, 2011 June 30, 2011 0.50
Total (2012) 2.05
Fiscal 2011
March 7, 2011 March 21, 2011 April 1, 2011 0.25
Total (2011) 0.25
$ 7.45

(1) All of our cash distributions to date were funded from net investment income, except approximately $0.07 per share and $0.40 per share of the distribution paid on June 29, 2012 and June 28, 2013,

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respectively, which was funded from long term capital gains. The tax characterization of cash distributions for the year ended March 31, 2014 will not be known until the tax return for that year is finalized.
(2) Represents a special dividend for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014.

For fiscal year 2014, we paid $1,344,083 and $2,638,151 in preferred dividends on the Series 2017 Term Preferred Shares and the Series 2023 Term Preferred Shares, respectively. For fiscal 2013, we paid $459,228 in preferred dividends on the Series 2017 Term Preferred Shares.

For accounting purposes the distributions declared on our common stock for the fiscal periods ended March 31, 2013, 2012 and 2011 were in excess of the reported earnings. However, as a RIC, earnings and distributions are determined on a tax basis. Furthermore, taxable earnings are determined according to tax regulations and differ from reported income for accounting purposes. For the fiscal periods ended March 31, 2013, 2012 and 2011 taxable earnings exceeded our distributions and there was no tax return of capital for these years. To the extent that taxable earnings for any fiscal year are less than the amount of the dividends paid during the year, there would be a tax return of capital to shareholders. Distributions in excess of current and accumulated taxable earnings and profits will generally not be taxable to the shareholders, because a tax return of capital represents a return of a portion of a shareholder’s original investment in our common stock to the extent of a shareholder’s basis in our stock. Generally, a tax return of capital will reduce an investor’s basis in our stock for federal tax purposes, which will result in the shareholder recognizing additional gain (or less loss) when the stock is sold. Assuming that a shareholder holds our stock as a capital asset, any such additional gain would be a capital gain. Shareholders should not assume that the source of all distributions is from our net profits and shareholders may periodically receive the payment of a dividend consisting of a return of capital. The tax character of any distributions will be determined after the end of the fiscal year. Tax matters are very complicated and the tax consequences to an investor of an investment in our shares will depend on the facts of its particular situation. We encourage investors to consult their own tax advisors regarding the specific consequences of such an investment, including tax reporting requirements, the applicability of federal, state, local and foreign tax laws, eligibility for the benefits of any applicable tax treaty and the effect of any possible changes in the tax laws.

Oxford Lane Management

Our investment activities are managed by Oxford Lane Management, which is an investment adviser that has registered under the Advisers Act. Under our Investment Advisory Agreement with Oxford Lane Management, we have agreed to pay Oxford Lane Management an annual base management fee based on our gross assets, as well as an incentive fee based on our performance. See “Investment Advisory Agreement.”

We expect to benefit from the proven ability of our investment adviser’s team to identify attractive opportunities, conduct diligence on and value prospective investments, negotiate terms where appropriate, and manage and monitor a diversified portfolio although we do not intend to operate as a “diversified” investment company within the meaning of the 1940 Act. Our investment adviser’s senior investment team members have broad investment backgrounds, with prior experience at investment banks, commercial banks, unregistered investment funds and other financial services companies, and have collectively developed a broad network of contacts to provide us with our principal source of investment opportunities.

Our investment adviser is led by Jonathan H. Cohen, our Chief Executive Officer and Saul B. Rosenthal, our President. Messrs. Cohen and Rosenthal are assisted by Darryl M. Monasebian and Hari Srinivasan, who serve as Executive Vice President and Managing Director, for Oxford Lane Management, respectively. We consider Messrs. Cohen, Rosenthal, Monasebian and Srinivasan to be Oxford Lane Management’s senior investment team.

Messrs. Cohen, Rosenthal, Monasebian and Srinivasan together with the other members of Oxford Lane Management’s investment team, have developed an infrastructure that we believe provides Oxford Lane Capital with a competitive advantage in locating and acquiring attractive Senior Loans and CLO investments. In particular, in addition to our portfolio, the members of Oxford Lane Management’s investment team currently manage the portfolios of:

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• TICC Capital Corp. , a NASDAQ Global Select Market-listed business development company, which completed its initial public offering in 2003, with approximately $1.1 billion in gross assets as of March 31, 2014, which is managed by TICC Management, LLC;
• TICC CLO LLC , a $225 million CLO structured finance vehicle completed in 2011 investing in a diversified portfolio of Senior Loans, the assets of which are included in the gross assets of TICC Capital Corp;
• TICC CLO 2012-1, LLC, a $320 million CLO structured finance vehicle completed in 2012 investing in a diversified portfolio of Senior Loans, the assets of which are included in the gross assets of TICC Capital Corp.; and
• T2 Income Fund CLO I Ltd. , originally was a twelve year, $309 million CLO structured finance vehicle completed in 2007 investing in a diversified portfolio of Senior Loans.

Since 2004, in the course of managing those existing portfolios, the members of Oxford Lane Management’s investment team have historically evaluated and invested primarily in a combination of bilateral and syndicated Senior Loans and structured finance vehicles, with the objective of producing high risk-adjusted returns primarily in the form of current income. Since June 2009, the members of Oxford Lane Management’s investment team have sourced and analyzed in excess of 300 primary and secondary CLO investments, and have invested an aggregate of approximately $725 million in 140 such transactions with an aggregate par value of approximately $900 million. In total, as of March 31, 2014, Oxford Lane Management’s investment team has reviewed over 1,000 transactions, has made more than 500 investments representing over $3.0 billion in invested capital and currently has approximately $1.7 billion under management.

Charles M. Royce is a non-managing member of Oxford Lane Management. Mr. Royce has served as President since 1972, and a member of the Board of Managers since 2001, of Royce & Associates. He also manages or co-manages twelve of Royce & Associates’ open- and closed-end registered funds. Mr. Royce currently serves on the Board of Directors of The Royce Funds and TICC Capital Corp. Mr. Royce is a non-managing member of TICC Management, LLC, the investment adviser for TICC Capital Corp. Mr. Royce, as a non-managing member of Oxford Lane Management, does not take part in the management or participate in the operations of Oxford Lane Management; however, Mr. Royce may be available from time to time to Oxford Lane Management to provide certain consulting services without compensation. Royce & Associates is a wholly owned subsidiary of Legg Mason, Inc.

In addition, our executive officers and directors, as well as the current and future members of our investment adviser, Oxford Lane Management, may serve as officers, directors or principals of other entities that operate in the same or a related line of business as we do. Accordingly, they may have obligations to investors in those entities, the fulfillment of which obligations may not be in the best interests of us or our stockholders. Each of TICC Capital Corp., TICC CLO LLC, TICC CLO 2012-1 LLC and T2 Income Fund CLO I Ltd., as well as any affiliated investment vehicle formed in the future and managed by our investment adviser or its affiliates may, notwithstanding different stated investment objectives, have overlapping investment objectives with our own and, accordingly, may invest in asset classes similar to those targeted by us. As a result, Oxford Lane Management may face conflicts in allocating investment opportunities between us and such other entities. Although Oxford Lane Management endeavors to allocate investment opportunities in a fair and equitable manner, it is possible that, in the future, we may not be given the opportunity to participate in investments made by investment funds, including TICC Capital Corp., TICC CLO LLC, TICC CLO 2012-1 LLC, and T2 Income Fund CLO I Ltd., managed by our investment adviser or an investment manager affiliated with our investment adviser. In any such case, when Oxford Lane Management’s investment team identifies an investment, it will be required to choose which investment fund should make the investment.

In certain instances, we may co-invest on a concurrent basis with affiliates of our investment adviser, subject to compliance with applicable regulations and regulatory guidance and our written allocation procedures. Such co-investment may require exemptive relief from the SEC. If we elect to seek such relief, there can be no assurance when, or if, such relief may be obtained.

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In addition, we will pay BDC Partners, an affiliate of Oxford Lane Management, our allocable portion of overhead and other expenses incurred by BDC Partners in performing its obligations under the Administration Agreement, including rent, the fees and expenses associated with performing compliance functions, and our allocable portion of the compensation of our Chief Financial Officer, Chief Compliance Officer and any administrative support staff. These arrangements will create conflicts of interest that our Board of Directors must monitor.

Investment Focus

Our investment objective is to maximize our portfolio’s total return. We have initially implemented our investment objective by investing principally in the equity and junior debt tranches of CLO vehicles, which are collateralized primarily by a diverse portfolio of leveraged corporate loans, and which generally have very little or no exposure to real estate or mortgage loans or to pools of consumer-based debt, such as credit card receivables or auto loans. Our investment strategy may also include warehouse facilities, which are financing structures intended to aggregate loans that may be used to form the basis of a CLO vehicle. We may invest in securities issued by foreign entities, including foreign CLO vehicles.

The CLO investments we currently hold in our portfolio generally represent either a residual economic interest, in the case of an equity tranche, or a debt investment collateralized by a portfolio of Senior Loans. The value of our CLO investments generally depend on both the quality and nature of the underlying portfolio it references and also on the specific structural characteristics of the CLO itself, both of which are described below.

CLO Structural Elements

Structurally, CLO vehicles are entities formed to originate and manage a portfolio of loans. The loans within the CLO vehicle are limited to loans which meet established credit criteria and are subject to concentration limitations in order to limit a CLO vehicle’s exposure to a single credit.

A CLO vehicle is formed by raising multiple “tranches” of debt (with the most senior tranches being rated “AAA” to the most junior tranches typically being rated “BB” or “B”) and equity. As interest payments are received the CLO vehicle makes contractual interest payments to each tranche of debt based on their seniority. If there are funds remaining after each tranche of debt receives its contractual interest rate and the CLO vehicle meets or exceeds required collateral coverage levels (or other similar covenants) the remaining funds may be paid to the equity tranche. The contractual provisions setting out this order of payments are set out in detail in the CLO vehicle’s indenture. These provisions are referred to as the “priority of payments” or the “waterfall” and determine any other obligations that may be required to be paid ahead of payments of interest and principal on the securities issued by a CLO vehicle. In addition, for payments to be made to each tranche, after the most senior tranche of debt, there are various tests which must be complied with, which are different for each CLO vehicle.

CLO indentures typically provide for adjustments to the priority of payments in the event that certain cashflow or collateral requirements are not maintained. The collateral quality tests that may divert cashflows in the priority of payments are predominantly determined by reference to the par values of the underlying loans, rather than their current market values. Accordingly, we believe that CLO equity and junior debt investments allow investors to gain diversified exposure to the Senior Loan market on a levered basis without being structurally subject to mark-to-market price fluctuations of the underlying loans. As such, although the current valuations of CLO equity and junior debt tranches are expected to fluctuate based on price changes within the loan market, interest rate movements and other macroeconomic factors, those tranches will generally be expected to continue to receive distributions from the CLO vehicle periodically so long as the underlying portfolio does not suffer defaults, realized losses or other covenant violations sufficient to trigger changes in the waterfall allocations. We therefore believe that an investment portfolio consisting of CLO equity and junior debt investments of this type has the ability to provide attractive risk-adjusted rates of return.

The diagram below is for illustrative purposes only. The CLO structure highlighted below is only a hypothetical structure and structures among CLO vehicles in which we may invest may vary substantially from the hypothetical example set forth below.

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[GRAPHIC MISSING]

The Syndicated Senior Loan Market

We believe that while the syndicated leveraged corporate loan market is relatively large, with Standard and Poor’s estimating the total par value outstanding at approximately $742 billion as of May 27, 2014, this market remains largely inaccessible to a significant portion of investors that are not lenders or approved institutions. The CLO market permits wider exposure to syndicated Senior Loans, but this market is almost exclusively private and predominantly institutional.

The Senior Loan market is characterized by various factors, including:

• Seniority. A Senior Loan typically ranks senior in a company’s capital structure to all other forms of debt or equity. As such, that loan maintains the senior-most claim on the company’s assets and cash flow, and, we believe should, all other things being equal, offer the prospect of a relatively more stable and lower-risk holding.
• Floating rate instruments. A Senior Loan typically contains a floating versus a fixed interest rate, which we believe provides some measure of protection against the risk of interest rate fluctuation.
• Frequency of interest payments. A Senior Loan typically provides for scheduled interest payments no less frequently than quarterly.

In the current environment, we believe the above attributes seem particularly desirable.

Investment Opportunity

Despite strength across the credit markets broadly, we believe that the market for CLO-related assets continues to provide us with the opportunity to generate attractive risk-adjusted returns within our strategy. We believe that a number of factors support this conclusion, including:

— We believe that the long-term and relatively low-cost capital that many CLO vehicles have secured, compared with current asset spreads and the associated LIBOR floors have created opportunities to purchase certain CLO equity and junior debt instruments that may produce attractive risk-adjusted returns. Although yields on Senior Loans have generally decreased since mid-2010, we believe that CLO equity and junior debt instruments still offer attractive risk-adjusted returns.
— We believe that the recently developed market to invest in warehouse financings, which are short-term facilities that are generally expected to form the basis of CLO vehicles (which the Fund may participate in or be repaid by), has created additional attractive risk-adjusted investment opportunities for us.

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— We believe that investing in CLO securities and CLO equity instruments and warehouse financings in particular, requires a high level of research and analysis. We believe that typically this analysis can only be adequately conducted by knowledgeable market participants, since that analysis tends to be highly specialized.
— We believe that a stronger credit market for Senior Loans has reduced the risk of collateral coverage test violations across many CLO structures, thereby reducing the risk that current cash distributions otherwise payable to junior debt tranches and/or equity will be diverted under the priority of payments to pay down the more senior obligations in various CLO structures.
— We believe that the US CLO market is relatively large with total assets under management of approximately $287 billion. (1) We estimate that the amount outstanding of the junior-most debt tranches (specifically the tranches originally rated “BB” and “B”) and equity tranches together are approximately $50 billion.

In addition to reviewing the junior debt and equity tranches of pre-2008 vintage CLOs, we have analyzed post-2010 CLOs (in both the primary and secondary markets) given the recent increase in new CLO issuance. From January 1, 2014 to April 29, 2014, CLO issuance stood at approximately $35 billion across 71 (2) deals (compared to approximately $82 billion across 171 deals for 2013). (3)

While the post-2010 CLOs generally have a higher cost of capital (which may result in lower returns for the equity investors in those CLOs) compared to pre-2008 CLOs, they may offer certain attractive structural features (including, in certain cases, better credit enhancement and lower leverage) and stronger collateral packages. We believe there are currently a significant number of these investment opportunities to consider and we have and continue to make investments in post-2010 CLOs.

We continue to review a large number of CLO investment vehicles in the current market environment, and we expect that the majority of our portfolio holdings, over the near to intermediate-term, will continue to be focused on CLO debt and equity securities, with the more significant focus over the near-term on CLO equity securities.

Investment Selection

Our investment adviser’s investment team is responsible for all aspects of our investment process. Oxford Lane Management’s senior investment team currently consists of Messrs. Cohen, Rosenthal and Monasebian, who serve as members of the investment committee of Oxford Lane and Mr. Srinivasan. While the investment strategy involves a team approach, whereby potential transactions are screened by various members of the investment team, Messrs. Cohen or Rosenthal must approve all investments in order for them to close. See “Portfolio Management.” The stages of our investment selection process are as follows:

Deal Sourcing

Deal sourcing is generally conducted through brokers and bankers, and may also be sourced through industry contacts, CLO vehicle sponsors and investors. We believe that we currently have an active pipeline of deal flow, particularly through multiple CLO trading desks.

Screening

In screening potential investments in CLO vehicles, our investment adviser’s investment team utilizes the same value-oriented investment philosophy they employ in their work managing other investment portfolios, including TICC Capital Corp., TICC CLO LLC, TICC CLO 2012-1 LLC, and T2 Income Fund CLO I Ltd.

1. As of April 29, 2014. Source: RBS Securities, Inc., Intex Solutions, Inc.

2. As of April 28, 2014. Source: JP Morgan Chase & Co.

3. As of January 24, 2014. Source: RBS.

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Due Diligence

Our investment adviser’s investment team conducts due diligence on prospective investments, consistent with the approach its members have developed over the course of managing other investment vehicles, including TICC Capital Corp., TICC CLO LLC, TICC CLO 2012-1 LLC, and T2 Income Fund CLO I Ltd. In conducting due diligence, our investment adviser uses publicly available information as well as information otherwise available to it, including through its relationships with CLO collateral managers and bankers.

Our investment adviser’s due diligence typically includes:

• review of current financial information and projections regarding prospective investments;
• research relating to the CLO’s underlying investments; and
• review of the prospective investment’s capital structure and the terms and conditions of the investment.

Upon the completion of due diligence, the investment professionals present the opportunity to our investment adviser’s investment committee, which then determines whether to proceed with the potential investment. Additional due diligence with respect to any investment may be conducted on our behalf by outside third-party advisers, as appropriate. Any fees and expenses incurred by Oxford Lane Management in connection with due diligence investigations undertaken by third parties will be subject to reimbursement by Oxford Lane Capital, which reimbursements will be in addition to any management or incentive fees payable under our Investment Advisory Agreement to Oxford Lane Management. While the investment strategy involves a team approach, Oxford Lane Capital may not enter into a transaction without the prior approval of either Messrs. Cohen or Rosenthal.

Ongoing Relationships

Monitoring

Our investment adviser monitors our investments on an ongoing basis. Our investment adviser has several methods of monitoring the performance and value of our investments, which include the following:

• review of pricing data and indicative bids for recent transactions in our investments;
• comparisons to other Senior Loans and CLO vehicles; and
• review of available financial reports for our investments.

Valuation Procedures

The most significant estimate inherent in the preparation of our financial statements is the valuation of investments and the related amounts of unrealized appreciation and depreciation of investments recorded. There is no single method for determining fair value in good faith. As a result, determining fair value requires that judgment be applied to the specific facts and circumstances of each portfolio investment while employing a consistently applied valuation process for the types of investments we make. We are required to specifically fair value each individual investment on a quarterly basis.

Our Board of Directors determines the value of our investment portfolio each quarter, after consideration of our Valuation Committee’s recommendation of fair value. Oxford Lane Management compiles the relevant information, including a financial summary, covenant compliance review and recent trading activity in the security, if known. All available information, including non-binding indicative bids which may not be considered reliable, are presented to the Valuation Committee to consider in making its recommendation of fair value to the Board of Directors. In some instances, there may be limited trading activity in a security even though the market for the security is considered not active. In such cases the Valuation Committee considers the number of trades, the size and timing of each trade, and other circumstances around such trades, to the extent such information is available, in making its recommendation of fair value to the Board of Directors. We may elect to engage third-party valuation firms to provide assistance to our Valuation Committee and Board of Directors in valuing certain of our investments. The Valuation Committee evaluates the impact of such additional information, and factors it into its consideration of fair value.

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Competition

We compete for investments with other investment funds (including private equity funds, mezzanine funds and business development companies), as well as traditional financial services companies such as commercial banks, investment banks, finance companies and other sources of funding. Additionally, because competition for investment opportunities generally has increased among alternative investment vehicles, such as hedge funds, those entities have begun to invest in areas they have not traditionally invested in, including CLO vehicles. As a result of these new entrants, competition for investment opportunities in CLO vehicles may intensify. Many of these entities have greater financial and managerial resources than we do. We believe we are able to compete with these entities primarily on the basis of the experience and contacts of our investment adviser, and our responsive and efficient investment analysis and decision-making processes.

Staffing

We do not currently have any employees. Our day-to-day investment operations are managed by Oxford Lane Management. Oxford Lane Management’s investment team currently consists of the members of its investment committee, Messrs. Cohen, Rosenthal and Monasebian, and Mr. Srinivasan, who serves as Managing Director for Oxford Lane Management, and five additional experienced investment professionals. Oxford Lane Management may retain additional investment professionals, based upon its needs, subsequent to the completion of this offering. See “Investment Advisory Agreement.”

In addition, we will reimburse BDC Partners for our allocable portion of overhead and other expenses incurred by it in performing its obligations under the Administration Agreement, including rent, the fees and expenses associated with performing compliance functions, and the compensation of our chief financial officer, chief compliance officer, treasurer and any administrative support staff. See “Administration Agreement.”

Properties

Our executive offices are located at 8 Sound Shore Drive, Suite 255, Greenwich, CT 06830, and are provided by BDC Partners in accordance with the terms of the Administration Agreement. We believe that our office facilities are suitable and adequate for our business as it is contemplated to be conducted.

Legal Proceedings

None of us, our investment adviser or administrator, is currently subject to any material legal proceedings, nor, to our knowledge, is any material legal proceeding threatened against us, or against our investment adviser or administrator. From time to time, we, our investment adviser or administrator, may be a party to certain legal proceedings in the ordinary course of business, including proceedings relating to the enforcement of our rights under contracts with our portfolio companies. While the outcome of these legal proceedings cannot be predicted, we do not expect that these proceedings will have a material effect upon our financial statements.

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MANAGEMENT

Our Board of Directors oversees our management. The Board of Directors currently consists of five members, three of whom are not “interested persons” of Oxford Lane Capital Corp. as defined in Section 2(a)(19) of the 1940 Act. We refer to these individuals as our independent directors. Our Board of Directors elects our officers, who serve at the discretion of the Board of Directors. The responsibilities of each director will include, among other things, the oversight of our investment activity, the quarterly valuation of our assets, and oversight of our financing arrangements. The Board of Directors has also established an Audit Committee and a Valuation Committee, and may establish additional committees in the future.

Board of Directors and Executive Officers

Directors

Information regarding the Board of Directors is as follows:

Name Age Position Director
Since
Expiration
of Term
Interested Directors
Jonathan H. Cohen 49 Chief Executive Officer and Director 2010 2016
Saul B. Rosenthal 45 President and Director 2010 2015
Independent Directors
Mark J. Ashenfelter 54 Chairman of the Board of Directors 2010 2016
John Reardon 47 Director 2010 2014
David S. Shin 46 Director 2010 2015

The address for each of our directors is c/o Oxford Lane Capital Corp., 8 Sound Shore Drive, Suite 255, Greenwich, CT 06830.

Executive Officers Who Are Not Directors

Name Age Position
Patrick F. Conroy 57 Chief Financial Officer, Chief Compliance Officer and
Corporate Secretary

Biographical Information

Directors

Our directors have been divided into two groups — interested directors and independent directors. An interested director is an “interested person” as defined in Section 2(a)(19) of the 1940 Act.

Interested Directors

Messrs. Cohen and Rosenthal are “interested persons” of Oxford Lane Capital as defined in the 1940 Act. Messrs. Cohen and Rosenthal are interested persons of Oxford Lane Capital due to their positions as Chief Executive Officer and President, respectively, of Oxford Lane Capital and Oxford Lane Management, Oxford Lane Capital’s investment adviser, and as the managing member and non-managing member, respectively, of BDC Partners, the administrator for Oxford Lane Capital.

Jonathan H. Cohen has served as Chief Executive Officer of both Oxford Lane Capital Corp. and Oxford Lane Management since 2010. Mr. Cohen has also served since 2003 as Chief Executive Officer of both TICC Capital Corp. (NasdaqGS: TICC), a publicly traded business development company, and TICC Management, LLC, TICC Capital Corp.’s investment adviser, and as the managing member of BDC Partners. Mr. Cohen is also a member of the Board of Directors of TICC Capital Corp. In addition, Mr. Cohen has served since 2005 as the Chief Executive Officer of T2 Advisers, LLC, which serves as the collateral manager for T2 Income Fund CLO I Ltd. Previously, Mr. Cohen managed technology equity research groups at Wit Capital, Merrill Lynch, UBS and Smith Barney. Mr. Cohen serves on the board of Algorithmic Implementations, Inc. (d/b/a Ai Squared) and is member of the Board of Trustees of Connecticut College.

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Mr. Cohen received a B.A. in Economics from Connecticut College and an M.B.A. from Columbia University. Mr. Cohen’s depth of experience in managerial positions in investment management, securities research and financial services, as well as his intimate knowledge of our business and operations, gives our Board of Directors valuable industry-specific knowledge and expertise on these and other matters.

Saul B. Rosenthal has served as President of both Oxford Lane Capital Corp. and Oxford Lane Management since 2010. Mr. Rosenthal has also served as President since 2004 of TICC Capital Corp. (NasdaqGS: TICC), a publicly traded business development company. In addition, Mr. Rosenthal has also served since 2005 as the President of T2 Advisers, LLC, which serves as collateral manager of T2 Income Fund CLO I Ltd. Mr. Rosenthal was previously an attorney at the law firm of Shearman & Sterling LLP. Mr. Rosenthal serves on the boards of Algorithmic Implementations, Inc. (d/b/a Ai Squared), the National Museum of Mathematics and the New York City chapter of the Young Presidents’ Organization (YPO). Mr. Rosenthal received a B.S., magna cum laude, from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, a J.D. from Columbia University Law School, where he was a Harlan Fiske Stone Scholar, and a LL.M. (Taxation) from New York University School of Law. Mr. Rosenthal’s depth of experience in managerial positions in investment management, as well as his intimate knowledge of our business and operations, gives the Board of Directors the valuable perspective of a knowledgeable corporate leader.

Independent Directors

The following directors are not “interested persons” of Oxford Lane Capital, as defined in the 1940 Act.

Mark J. Ashenfelter presently serves as a Senior Vice President and the General Counsel of Haebler Capital, a private investment company located in Greenwich, CT. Prior to joining Haebler Capital in 1994, Mr. Ashenfelter was an associate at Cravath, Swaine & Moore from 1985 to 1992 and Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft from 1992 to 1994. Mr. Ashenfelter received a B.A., cum laude, from Harvard University, a J.D., magna cum laude, from New York Law School, where he was Managing Editor of the Law Review, and a LL.M. (Taxation) from New York University School of Law. Mr. Ashenfelter’s extensive corporate legal experience, particularly in connection with investment companies, provides our Board of Directors with valuable insight and perspective.

John Reardon is the principal of Reardon Consulting, LLP, which specializes in providing management consulting services to technology companies in the telecom, software, and cyber security industries. Mr. Reardon also serves as the Managing Director of Choctaw Telecom LLC. Previously, Mr. Reardon managed telecommunications companies in the mobile voice, data and engineering services markets as Chief Executive Officer and a member of the Board of Directors of Mobex Communications, Inc. from 2001 to 2005. From 1997 to 2001, he served as General Counsel and Secretary of the Board of Directors of Mobex Communications, Inc. Mr. Reardon began his career in telecom law at the boutique Washington, DC firm of Keller and Heckman, LLP. Mr. Reardon received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from Boston University, summa cum laude, and earned his J.D. from Columbia Law School. He is admitted to the New York State Bar and the Washington, DC Bar, and is the past president of the Columbia Law School Alumni Association of Washington, DC. Mr. Reardon’s extensive experience as a senior corporate executive provides our Board of Directors the perspective of a knowledgeable corporate leader.

David S. Shin presently serves as an asset management professional at Perella Weinberg Partners, a financial services firm. From 2010 to 2011, Mr. Shin served as a Managing Director at Bentley Associates, an investment banking firm. Prior to joining Bentley Associates, Mr. Shin worked in the Global Real Estate Investment Banking Group at Deutsche Bank Securities from 2005 to 2008, and in the Real Estate & Lodging Group of Citigroup Global Markets from 2004 to 2005. Prior to that, Mr. Shin worked for William Street Advisors, LLC, a boutique financial advisory firm affiliated with Saratoga Management Company, from 2002 to 2004. After receiving his J.D. in 1995, Mr. Shin was a member of the Healthcare Group of Dean Witter Reynolds from 1995 to 1996, and was subsequently a member of the Mergers & Acquisitions Group of Merrill Lynch & Co. from 1996 to 2002. Mr. Shin started his career as a CPA in the Corporate Tax Department of KPMG Peat Marwick’s Financial Institutions Group, where he served from 1990 to 1992, before attending law school. Mr. Shin received a B.S. from The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and a J.D. from Columbia University Law School. Mr. Shin’s extensive experience in investment

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banking provides the Board of Directors with valuable insights of an experienced and diligent financial professional, as well as a diverse perspective.

Executive Officers Who Are Not Directors

Patrick F. Conroy has served as our Chief Financial Officer, Chief Compliance Officer and Corporate Secretary since 2010. Mr. Conroy has also served as the Chief Financial Officer since 2003, and the Chief Compliance Officer and Corporate Secretary since 2004, of TICC Capital Corp., a publicly traded business development company. Mr. Conroy also currently serves as the Chief Financial Officer, Chief Compliance Officer and Treasurer of Oxford Lane Management, TICC Management, LLC and BDC Partners. Mr. Conroy has also served since 2005 as the Chief Financial Officer of T2 Advisers, LLC which serves as collateral manager of T2 Income Fund CLO I Ltd. He is a certified public accountant. Mr. Conroy received a B.S. in Accounting, summa cum laude, from St. John’s University and did graduate work at Bernard M. Baruch College of the City University of New York.

Director Independence

In accordance with rules of the NASDAQ Stock Market, our Board of Directors will annually determine each director’s independence. We do not consider a director independent unless the Board of Directors has determined that he or she has no material relationship with us. We will monitor the relationships of our directors and officers through a questionnaire each director completes no less frequently than annually and updates periodically as information provided in the most recent questionnaire changes.

In order to evaluate the materiality of any such relationship, the Board of Directors uses the definition of director independence set forth in the rules promulgated by the NASDAQ Stock Market. Rule 5605(a)(2) provides that a director of an investment company shall be considered to be independent if he or she is not an “interested person” of Oxford Lane Capital, as defined in Section 2(a)(19) of the 1940 Act.

The Board of Directors has determined that each of the directors is independent and has no relationship with us, except as a director and stockholder, with the exception of Jonathan H. Cohen and Saul B. Rosenthal, as a result of their respective positions as Chief Executive Officer and President of Oxford Lane Capital and Oxford Lane Management, Oxford Lane Capital’s investment adviser, and as the managing member and non-managing member, respectively, of BDC Partners, the administrator for Oxford Lane Capital.

Board Leadership Structure

Our Board of Directors monitors and performs an oversight role with respect to the business and affairs of Oxford Lane Capital, including with respect to investment practices and performance, compliance with regulatory requirements and the services, expenses and performance of service providers to Oxford Lane Capital. Among other things, our Board of Directors approves the appointment of our investment adviser and officers, reviews and monitors the services and activities performed by our investment adviser and executive officers and approves the engagement, and reviews the performance of, our independent registered public accounting firm.

Under our bylaws, our Board of Directors may designate a Chairman to preside over the meetings of the Board of Directors and meetings of the stockholders and to perform such other duties as may be assigned to him by the Board of Directors. We do not have a fixed policy as to whether the Chairman of the Board of Directors should be an independent director and believe that we should maintain the flexibility to select the Chairman and reorganize the leadership structure, from time to time, based on the criteria that is in the best interests of Oxford Lane Capital and its stockholders at such times.

Presently, Mr. Ashenfelter serves as the Chairman of our Board of Directors. Mr. Ashenfelter is not an “interested person” of Oxford Lane Capital as defined in Section 2(a)(19) of the 1940 Act. We believe that Mr. Ashenfelter’s extensive corporate legal experience, particularly in connection with investment companies, qualify him to serve as the Chairman of our Board of Directors. We believe that we are best served through this existing leadership structure, as Mr. Ashenfelter’s independence from our investment adviser eliminates any perceived conflicts of interest and ensures that our management team acts in the best interests of our stockholders.

Our corporate governance policies include regular meetings of the independent directors in executive session with independent legal counsel and without the presence of interested directors and management, the

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establishment of Audit and Valuation Committees comprised solely of independent directors and the appointment of a Chief Compliance Officer, with whom the independent directors meet regularly without the presence of interested directors and other members of management, for administering our compliance policies and procedures.

We recognize that different board leadership structures are appropriate for companies in different situations. We intend to re-examine our corporate governance policies on an ongoing basis to ensure that they continue to meet our needs.

Board’s Role In Risk Oversight

Our Board of Directors performs its risk oversight function primarily through (i) its two standing committees, which report to the entire Board of Directors and are comprised solely of independent directors, and (ii) active monitoring of our Chief Compliance Officer and our compliance policies and procedures.

As described below in more detail under “Committees of the Board of Directors,” the Audit Committee and the Valuation Committee assist the Board of Directors in fulfilling its risk oversight responsibilities. The Audit Committee’s risk oversight responsibilities include overseeing our accounting and financial reporting processes, our systems of internal controls regarding finance and accounting, and audits of our financial statements. The Valuation Committee’s risk oversight responsibilities include establishing guidelines and making recommendations to our Board of Directors regarding the valuation of our loans and investments. Moreover, the independent directors of our Board of Directors are responsible for selecting, researching and nominating directors for election by our stockholders, developing and recommending to the Board of Directors a set of corporate governance principles and overseeing the evaluation of the Board of Directors and our management.

Our Board of Directors also performs its risk oversight responsibilities with the assistance of our Chief Compliance Officer. The Board of Directors annually reviews a written report from the Chief Compliance Officer discussing the adequacy and effectiveness of the compliance policies and procedures of Oxford Lane Capital and its service providers. The Chief Compliance Officer’s annual report will address at a minimum (i) the operation of the compliance policies and procedures of Oxford Lane Capital and its service providers since the last report; (ii) any material changes to such policies and procedures since the last report; (iii) any recommendations for material changes to such policies and procedures as a result of the Chief Compliance Officer’s annual review; and (iv) any compliance matter that has occurred since the date of the last report about which the Board of Directors would reasonably need to know to oversee our compliance activities and risks. In addition, the Chief Compliance Officer meets separately in executive session with the independent directors at least quarterly.

We believe that our Board of Directors’ role in risk oversight is effective and appropriate given the extensive regulation to which we are already subject as an investment company. As a registered closed-end management investment company, we are required to comply with certain regulatory requirements that control the levels of risk in our business and operations. For example, our ability to incur indebtedness is limited such that our asset coverage must equal at least 300% immediately after each time we incur indebtedness and we are limited in our ability to invest in any CLO vehicle in which one of our affiliates currently has an investment.

We recognize that different board roles in risk oversight are appropriate for companies in different situations. We re-examine the manner in which the Board of Directors administers its oversight function on an ongoing basis to ensure that they continue to meet our needs.

Committees of the Board of Directors

Our Board of Directors has established an Audit Committee and a Valuation Committee. We require each director to make a diligent effort to attend all Board and committee meetings, as well as each annual meeting of stockholders.

Audit Committee

The Audit Committee operates pursuant to a charter approved by our Board of Directors, a copy of which is available on our website at http://www.oxfordlanecapital.com . The charter sets forth the

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responsibilities of the Audit Committee. The Audit Committee’s responsibilities include recommending the selection of our independent registered public accounting firm, reviewing with such independent registered public accounting firm the planning, scope and results of their audit of our financial statements, pre-approving the fees for services performed, reviewing with the independent registered public accounting firm the adequacy of internal control systems, reviewing our annual financial statements and periodic filings, and receiving the audit reports covering our financial statements. The Audit Committee is presently composed of three persons: Messrs. Shin, Ashenfelter and Reardon, all of whom are considered independent under the rules promulgated by the NASDAQ Stock Market. Our Board of Directors has determined that Mr. Shin is an “audit committee financial expert” as that term is defined under Item 407 of Regulation S-K of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Mr. Shin meets the current independence and experience requirements of Rule 10A-3 of the Exchange Act and, in addition, is not an “interested person” of Oxford Lane Capital as defined in Section 2(a)(19) of the 1940 Act. Mr. Shin currently serves as Chairman of the Audit Committee. The Audit Committee met on four occasions during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014.

Valuation Committee

The Valuation Committee establishes guidelines and makes recommendations to our Board of Directors regarding the valuation of investments. Our portfolio investments will generally not be publicly traded securities. As a result, there will not be a readily determinable market value for these securities. Thus, as required by the 1940 Act for such securities, we will value these securities at fair value as determined in good faith by our Board of Directors based upon the recommendation of the Valuation Committee.

Our Board of Directors will determine the value of our investment portfolio each quarter, after consideration of our Valuation Committee’s recommendation of fair value. Oxford Lane Management will compile relevant information, including a financial summary, covenant compliance review and recent trading activity in the security, if known. All available information, including non-binding indicative bids which may not be considered reliable, will be presented to the Valuation Committee to consider in making its recommendation of fair value to the Board of Directors. In some instances, there may be limited trading activity in a security even though the market for the security is considered not active. In such cases the Valuation Committee will consider the number of trades, the size and timing of each trade, and other circumstances around such trades, to the extent such information is available, in making its recommendation of fair value to the Board of Directors. We may elect to engage third-party valuation firms to provide assistance to our Valuation Committee and Board of Directors in valuing certain of our investments. The Valuation Committee will evaluate the impact of such additional information, and factor it into its consideration of fair value.

The Valuation Committee is presently composed of Messrs. Ashenfelter, Shin and Reardon. Mr. Ashenfelter currently serves as Chairman of the Valuation Committee. The Valuation Committee met on four occasions during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014.

Nominating and Corporate Governance Procedures

We do not have a Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee. A majority of the independent directors of the Board of Directors, in accordance with the NASDAQ Global Select Market listing standards, recommends candidates for election as directors. We do not currently have a charter or written policy with regard to the nomination process or stockholder recommendations. The absence of such a policy does not mean, however, that a stockholder recommendation would not be considered if one is received.

Our independent directors will consider qualified director nominees recommended by stockholders when such recommendations are submitted in accordance with our bylaws and any applicable law, rule or regulation regarding director nominations. When submitting a nomination for consideration, a stockholder must provide certain information that would be required under applicable SEC rules, including the following minimum information for each director nominee: full name, age and address; principal occupation during the past five years; current directorships on publicly held companies and investment companies; number of shares of our common stock owned, if any; and, a written consent of the individual to stand for election if nominated by our Board of Directors and to serve if elected by the stockholders.

In evaluating director nominees, our independence directors consider the following factors:

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• the appropriate size and composition of our Board of Directors;
• whether or not the person is an “interested person” of Oxford Lane Capital as defined in Section 2(a)(19) of the 1940 Act;
• the needs of Oxford Lane Capital with respect to the particular talents and experience of its directors;
• the knowledge, skills and experience of nominees in light of prevailing business conditions and the knowledge, skills and experience already possessed by other members of the Board of Directors;
• high character and integrity;
• familiarity with national and international business matters;
• experience with accounting rules and practices;
• appreciation of the relationship of our business to the changing needs of society;
• the desire to balance the considerable benefit of continuity with the periodic injection of the fresh perspective provided by new members; and
• all applicable laws, rules, regulations, and listing standards.

The Board of Directors’ goal is to assemble a Board of Directors that brings to Oxford Lane Capital a variety of perspectives and skills derived from high quality business and professional experience.

Other than the foregoing there are no stated minimum criteria for director nominees, although our independent directors may also consider such other factors as they may deem are in the best interests of Oxford Lane Capital and its stockholders. The Board of Directors also believes it appropriate for certain key members of our management to participate as members of the Board of Directors.

The independent members of the Board of Directors identify nominees by first evaluating the current members of the Board of Directors willing to continue in service. Current members of the Board of Directors with skills and experience that are relevant to our business and who are willing to continue in service are considered for re-nomination, balancing the value of continuity of service by existing members of the Board of Directors with that of obtaining a new perspective. If any member of the Board of Directors does not wish to continue in service or if the Board of Directors decides not to re-nominate a member for re-election, the independent members of the Board of Directors identify the desired skills and experience of a new nominee in light of the criteria above. The entire Board of Directors is polled for suggestions as to individuals meeting the aforementioned criteria. Research may also be performed to identify qualified individuals. To date, we have not engaged third parties to identify or evaluate or assist in identifying potential nominees although each reserves the right in the future to retain a third party search firm, if necessary.

The Board of Directors has not adopted a formal policy with regard to the consideration of diversity in identifying director nominees. In determining whether to recommend a director nominee, the Board of Directors considers and discusses diversity, among other factors, with a view toward the needs of the board of directors as a whole. The Board of Directors generally conceptualizes diversity expansively to include, without limitation, concepts such as race, gender, national origin, differences of viewpoint, professional experience, education, skill and other qualities that contribute to the Board of Directors, when identifying and recommending director nominees. The Board of Directors believes that the inclusion of diversity as one of many factors considered in selecting director nominees is consistent with the Board of Directors’ goal of creating a Board of Directors that best serves the needs of Oxford Lane Capital and the interests of its shareholders.

Communication with the Board of Directors

Stockholders with questions about Oxford Lane Capital are encouraged to contact Oxford Lane Capital Corp.’s Investor Relations Department. However, if stockholders believe that their questions have not been addressed, they may communicate with our Board of Directors by sending their communications to Oxford Lane Capital Corp., c/o Patrick F. Conroy, Corporate Secretary, 8 Sound Shore Drive, Suite 255, Greenwich, Connecticut 06830. All stockholder communications received in this manner will be delivered to one or more members of the Board of Directors, as appropriate.

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Code of Ethics

We have adopted a code of ethics which applies to, among others, our senior officers, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as well as every officer, director and employee of Oxford Lane Capital. Our code of ethics can be accessed via its website at http://www.oxfordlanecapital.com .

Compensation of Directors

The following table sets forth compensation of our directors for the year ended March 31, 2014.

Name Fees Earned or
Paid in Cash (1)
All Other
Compensation (2)
Total
Interested Directors
Jonathan H. Cohen — — —
Saul B. Rosenthal — — —
Independent Directors
Mark J. Ashenfelter $ 53,000 — $ 53,000
John Reardon $ 53,000 — $ 53,000
David S. Shin $ 58,000 — $ 58,000

(1) For a discussion of the independent directors’ compensation, see below.
(2) We do not maintain a stock or option plan, non-equity incentive plan or pension plan for our directors.

The independent directors receive an annual fee of $35,000. In addition, the independent directors receive $2,000 plus reimbursement of reasonable out-of-pocket expenses incurred in connection with attending each Board of Directors meeting, $1,500 plus reimbursement of reasonable out-of-pocket expenses incurred in connection with attending each Valuation Committee meeting and $1,000 plus reimbursement of reasonable out-of-pocket expenses incurred in connection with attending each Audit Committee meeting. The Chairman of the Audit Committee also receives an additional annual fee of $5,000. No compensation is paid to directors who are interested persons of Oxford Lane Capital as defined in the 1940 Act.

Compensation of Chief Executive Officer and Other Executive Officers

We do not have a compensation committee because our executive officers do not receive any direct compensation from Oxford Lane Capital. Mr. Cohen, our Chief Executive Officer, and Mr. Rosenthal, our President, through their ownership interest in BDC Partners, the managing member of Oxford Lane Management, are entitled to a portion of any profits earned by Oxford Lane Management, which includes any fees payable to Oxford Lane Management under the terms of the Investment Advisory Agreement, less expenses incurred by Oxford Lane Management in performing its services under the Investment Advisory Agreement. Messrs. Cohen and Rosenthal do not receive any additional compensation from Oxford Lane Management in connection with the management of our portfolio.

The compensation of Mr. Conroy, our Chief Financial Officer, Chief Compliance Officer and Corporate Secretary, is paid by our administrator, BDC Partners, subject to reimbursement by us of an allocable portion of such compensation for services rendered by Mr. Conroy to Oxford Lane Capital.

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PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT

The management of our investment portfolio is the responsibility of Oxford Lane Management, and its investment committee, which currently consists of Jonathan H. Cohen, our Chief Executive Officer, and Saul B. Rosenthal, our President, and Darryl M. Monasebian, the Executive Vice President of Oxford Lane Management. Our investment adviser’s investment committee must approve each new investment that we make. The members of our investment adviser’s investment committee are not employed by us, and receive no compensation from us in connection with their portfolio management activities. Messrs. Cohen and Rosenthal, through their ownership of BDC Partners, the managing member of Oxford Lane Management, are entitled to a portion of any investment advisory fees paid by Oxford Lane Capital to Oxford Lane Management.

Because Oxford Lane Management currently provides portfolio management services only to us, we do not believe there are any conflicts of interests with respect to Oxford Lane Management’s management of our portfolio on the one hand, and the management of other accounts or investment vehicles by Oxford Lane Management on the other. However, Mr. Cohen currently serves as Chief Executive Officer and Mr. Rosenthal currently serves as President and Chief Operating Officer of TICC Capital Corp., a publicly-traded business development company that invests principally in the debt of U.S.-based companies and is the collateral manager of TICC CLO LLC and TICC CLO 2012-1 LLC, and TICC Capital Corp.’s investment adviser, TICC Management. In addition, Messrs. Cohen and Rosenthal currently serve as Chief Executive Officer and President, respectively, for T2 Advisers, LLC, which serves as collateral manager of T2 Income Fund CLO I Ltd. BDC Partners is the managing member, and Charles M. Royce is a non-managing member, of TICC Management, LLC. As a result, Messrs. Cohen and Rosenthal may be subject to certain conflicts of interests with respect to their management of our portfolio on the one hand, and their respective obligations to manage TICC Capital Corp., TICC CLO LLC, TICC CLO 2012-1 LLC and T2 Income Fund CLO I Ltd. on the other hand.

Set forth below is additional information regarding the additional entities currently managed by Messrs. Cohen and Rosenthal:

Name Entity Investment Focus Gross Assets (1)
TICC Capital Corp. (2) Business development company Principally debt investments in U.S.-based companies $1,094 million
T2 Income Fund CLO I Ltd. Cayman-based structured finance vehicle Principally debt investments across a variety of industries $276 million

(1) Gross assets are calculated as of March 31, 2014 and are rounded to the nearest million.
(2) Includes the gross assets held by TICC CLO LLC and TICC CLO 2012-1 LLC.

Investment Personnel

Our investment adviser is led by Jonathan H. Cohen, our Chief Executive Officer and Saul B. Rosenthal, our President. Messrs. Cohen and Rosenthal are assisted by Darryl M. Monasebian and Hari Srinivasan, who serve as Executive Vice President and Managing Director for Oxford Lane Management, respectively. We consider Messrs. Cohen, Rosenthal, Monasebian and Srinivasan to be Oxford Lane Management’s senior investment team. We consider Messrs. Cohen and Rosenthal to be our portfolio managers.

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The table below shows the dollar range of shares of our common stock owned by each of our portfolio managers as of June 4, 2014.

Name of Portfolio Manager Dollar Range of Equity
Securities in Oxford
Lane Capital (1)
Jonathan H. Cohen Over $1,000,000
Saul B. Rosenthal Over $1,000,000

(1) Dollar ranges are as follows: None, $1 – $10,000, $10,001 – $50,000, $50,001 – $100,000, $100,001 – $500,000; $500,001 – $1,000,000 or Over $1,000,000.
(2) The dollar range of equity securities beneficially owned in us is based on the closing price of our common stock of $17.68 on June 4, 2014 on the Nasdaq Global Select Market.

The following information pertains to the members of Oxford Lane Management’s investment team who are not executive officers of Oxford Lane Capital:

Darryl M. Monasebian. Mr. Monasebian is the Executive Vice President and head of portfolio management of Oxford Lane Management and also holds the same positions at TICC Management, LLC, the investment adviser to TICC Capital Corp. Mr. Monasebian has also served since 2005 as the senior managing director and head of portfolio management of T2 Advisers, LLC, which serves as collateral manager of T2 Income Fund CLO I Ltd. Prior to joining TICC Management, LLC, Mr. Monasebian was a director in the Merchant Banking Group at BNP Paribas, and prior to that was a director at Swiss Bank Corporation and a senior account officer at Citibank. He began his business career at Metropolitan Life Insurance Company as an investment analyst in the Corporate Investments Department. Mr. Monasebian received a B.S. in Management Science/Operations Research from Case Western Reserve University and a Masters of Business Administration from Boston University’s Graduate School of Management.

Hari Srinivasan. Mr. Srinivasan is a Managing Director and portfolio manager of Oxford Lane Management, and also holds those same positions at TICC Management, LLC, the investment adviser to TICC Capital Corp., and at T2 Advisers, LLC, which serves as collateral manager of T2 Income Fund CLO I Ltd. Previously, Mr. Srinivasan was a credit manager at Lucent Technologies from 2002 to 2005, focusing on restructuring and monetization of distressed assets in Lucent’s vendor finance portfolio, and credit analysis of Lucent’s telecom customers. Prior to that, Mr. Srinivasan was an analyst in the fixed income group at Lehman Brothers from 1998 to 2002. Mr. Srinivasan received a B.S. in Computer Science from Poona University, India and a Masters of Business Administration from New York University’s Stern School of Business.

Debdeep Maji. Mr. Maji is a Principal of Oxford Lane Management, TICC Management, LLC, the investment adviser to TICC Capital Corp., and T2 Advisers, LLC, which serves as collateral manager of T2 Income Fund CLO I Ltd. Mr. Maji graduated from the Jerome Fisher Program in Management and Technology at the University of Pennsylvania where he received a Bachelor of Science degree in Economics from the Wharton School (and was designated a Joseph Wharton Scholar) and a Bachelor of Applied Science from the School of Engineering.

Kevin P. Yonon. Mr. Yonon is a Senior Vice President of Oxford Lane Management, and also holds the same position at TICC Management, LLC, the investment adviser to TICC Capital Corp., and T2 Advisers, LLC, which serves as collateral manager of T2 Income Fund CLO I Ltd. Previously, Mr. Yonon was an Associate at Deutsche Bank Securities and prior to that he was an Analyst at Blackstone Mezzanine Partners. Before joining Blackstone, he worked as an Analyst at Merrill Lynch in the Mergers & Acquisitions group. Mr. Yonon received a B.S. in Economics with concentrations in Finance and Accounting from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, where he graduated magna cum laude, and an M.B.A. from the Harvard Business School.

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Joseph Kupka. Mr. Kupka is a Senior Associate of Oxford Lane Management, TICC Management, LLC, the investment adviser to TICC Capital Corp. and T2 Advisers, LLC, which serves as collateral manager of T2 Income Fund CLO I Ltd. Previously, he worked as a risk analyst for First Equity Card Corporation. Mr. Kupka received a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania.

Erica Davis. Ms. Davis is an Associate of Oxford Lane Management, TICC Management, LLC, the investment adviser to TICC Capital Corp. and T2 Advisers, LLC, which serves as collateral manager of T2 Income Fund CLO I Ltd. Previously, she worked as a fixed income analyst at Goldman Sachs and an investment banking analyst at Barclays Capital. Ms. Davis received a Bachelor of Science degree in Economics with a concentration in Finance from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, where she graduated cum laude.

Caleb Li. Mr. Li is an Associate of Oxford Lane Management, TICC Management, LLC, the investment adviser to TICC Capital Corp. and T2 Advisers, LLC, which serves as collateral manager of T2 Income Fund CLO I Ltd. Previously, he worked as an investment banking analyst at RBC Capital Markets. He graduated with a dual degree from the University of Pennsylvania where he received a B.S. in Economics (cum laude) with a concentration in Finance from the Wharton School and a B.A. in Mathematics (cum laude) from the College of Arts and Sciences.

Compensation

None of Oxford Lane Management’s investment personnel receive any direct compensation from us in connection with the management of our portfolio. Messrs. Cohen and Rosenthal, through their ownership interest in BDC Partners, the managing member of Oxford Lane Management, are entitled to a portion of any profits earned by Oxford Lane Management, which includes any fees payable to Oxford Lane Management under the terms of the Investment Advisory Agreement, less expenses incurred by Oxford Lane Management in performing its services under the Investment Advisory Agreement. Messrs. Cohen and Rosenthal do not receive any additional compensation from Oxford Lane Management in connection with the management of our portfolio. The compensation paid by Oxford Lane Management to its other investment personnel includes: (i) annual base salary and (ii) portfolio-based performance award.

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INVESTMENT ADVISORY AGREEMENT

Management Services

Oxford Lane Management serves as our investment adviser. Oxford Lane Management is an investment adviser that is registered as an investment adviser under the Advisers Act prior to pricing of this offering. Subject to the overall supervision of our Board of Directors, our investment adviser manages the day-to-day operations of, and provides investment advisory and management services to, Oxford Lane Capital. Under the terms of our Investment Advisory Agreement, Oxford Lane Management:

• determines the composition of our portfolio, the nature and timing of the changes to our portfolio and the manner of implementing such changes;
• identifies, evaluates and negotiates the structure of the investments we make (including performing due diligence on our prospective investments);
• closes and monitors the investments we make; and
• provides us with other investment advisory, research and related services as we may from time to time require.

Oxford Lane Management’s services under the Investment Advisory Agreement are not exclusive, and both it and its members, officers and employees are free to furnish similar services to other entities so long as its services to us are not impaired.

Management Fee

Pursuant to the Investment Advisory Agreement, we have agreed to pay Oxford Lane Management a fee for investment advisory and management services consisting of two components — a base management fee and an incentive fee.

The base management fee is calculated at an annual rate of 2.00% of our gross assets. For services rendered under the Investment Advisory Agreement, the base management fee is payable quarterly in arrears. The base management fee is calculated based on the average value of our gross assets at the end of the two most recently completed calendar quarters, and appropriately adjusted for any share issuances or repurchases during the current calendar quarter. Base management fees for any partial month or quarter will be appropriately pro-rated.

The incentive fee is calculated and payable quarterly in arrears based on our pre-incentive fee net investment income for the immediately preceding calendar quarter. For this purpose, pre-incentive fee net investment income means interest income, dividend income and any other income (including any other fees, such as commitment, origination, structuring, diligence and consulting fees or other fees that we receive from an investment) accrued during the calendar quarter, minus our operating expenses for the quarter (including the base management fee, expenses payable under the Administration Agreement to BDC Partners, and any interest expense and dividends paid on any issued and outstanding preferred stock, but excluding the incentive fee). Pre-incentive fee net investment income includes accrued income that we have not yet received in cash, such as the amount of any market discount we may accrue on debt instruments we purchase below par value. Pre-incentive fee net investment income does not include any realized capital gains. Pre-incentive fee net investment income, expressed as a rate of return on the value of our net assets at the end of the immediately preceding calendar quarter, is compared to a hurdle of 1.75% per quarter (7.00% annualized). For such purposes, our quarterly rate of return is determined by dividing our pre-incentive net investment income by our reported net assets as of the prior period end. Our net investment income used to calculate this part of the incentive fee is also included in the amount of our gross assets used to calculate the 2.00% base management fee. We pay Oxford Lane Management an incentive fee with respect to our pre-incentive fee net investment income in each calendar quarter as follows:

• no incentive fee in any calendar quarter in which our pre-incentive fee net investment income does not exceed the hurdle of 1.75%;
• 100% of our pre-incentive fee net investment income with respect to that portion of such pre-incentive fee net investment income, if any, that exceeds the hurdle but is less than 2.1875% in

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any calendar quarter (8.75% annualized). We refer to this portion of our pre-incentive fee net investment income (which exceeds the hurdle but is less than 2.1875%) as the “catch-up.” The “catch-up” is meant to provide our investment adviser with 20% of our pre-incentive fee net investment income as if a hurdle did not apply if this net investment income exceeds 2.1875% in any calendar quarter; and
• 20% of the amount of our pre-incentive fee net investment income, if any, that exceeds 2.1875% in any calendar quarter (8.75% annualized) is payable to Oxford Lane Management (once the hurdle is reached and the catch-up is achieved, 20% of all pre-incentive fee investment income thereafter is allocated to Oxford Lane Management).

The following is a graphical representation of the calculation of the income-related portion of the incentive fee:

Quarterly Incentive Fee Based on Net Investment Income

Pre-incentive fee net investment income
(expressed as a percentage of the value of net assets)

[GRAPHIC MISSING]

Percentage of pre-incentive fee net investment income allocated to the Oxford Lane Management

These calculations are appropriately pro-rated for any period of less than three months and adjusted for any share issuances or repurchases during the relevant quarter. You should be aware that a rise in the general level of interest rates can be expected to lead to higher interest rates applicable to our debt investments. Accordingly, an increase in interest rates would make it easier for us to meet or exceed the incentive fee hurdle rate and may result in a substantial increase of the amount of incentive fees payable to our investment adviser with respect to pre-incentive fee net investment income.

No incentive fee is payable to our investment adviser on realized capital gains. In addition, the amount of the incentive fee is not affected by any realized or unrealized losses that we may suffer.

Examples of Quarterly Incentive Fee Calculation (amounts expressed as a percentage of the value of net assets, and are not annualized)

Alternative 1:

Assumptions

Investment income (including interest, dividends, fees, etc.) = 1.25%

Hurdle rate (1) = 1.75%

Management fee (2) = 0.5%

Other expenses (legal, accounting, custodian, transfer agent, etc.) (3) = 0.20%

Pre-incentive fee net investment income

(investment income – (management fee + other expenses)) = 0.55%

Pre-incentive net investment income does not exceed hurdle rate, therefore there is no incentive fee.

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Alternative 2:

Assumptions

Investment income (including interest, dividends, fees, etc.) = 2.70%

Hurdle rate (1) = 1.75%

Management fee (2) = 0.5%

Other expenses (legal, accounting, custodian, transfer agent, etc.) (3) = 0.20%

Pre-incentive fee net investment income

(investment income – (management fee + other expenses)) = 2.00%

Incentive fee = 100% × pre-incentive fee net investment income in excess of the hurdle but less than 2.1875% (i.e. the “catch-up” (4) )

= 100% × (2.0% – 1.75%)

= 0.25%

Alternative 3:

Assumptions

Investment income (including interest, dividends, fees, etc.) = 3.00%

Hurdle rate (1) = 1.75%

Management fee (2) = 0.5%

Other expenses (legal, accounting, custodian, transfer agent, etc.) (3) = 0.20%

Pre-incentive fee net investment income

(investment income – (management fee + other expenses)) = 2.3%

Incentive fee = 20% × pre-incentive fee net investment income, subject to “catch-up” (4)

Incentive fee = 100% × “catch-up” + (20% × (pre-incentive fee net investment income – 2.1875%))

Catch-up = 2.1875% – 1.75%

= 0.4375%

Incentive fee = (100% × 0.4375%) + (20% × (2.3% – 2.1875%))

= 0.4375% + (20% × 0.1125%)

= 0.4375% + 0.0225%

= 0.46%

(1) Represents 7% annualized hurdle rate.
(2) Represents 2.00% annualized management fee.
(3) Excludes organizational and offering expenses.
(4) The “catch-up” provision is intended to provide the investment adviser with an incentive fee of 20% on all of Oxford Lane Capital’s pre-incentive fee net investment income as if a hurdle rate did not apply when its net investment income exceeds 2.1875% in any calendar quarter.

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Payment of Our Expenses

The investment team of our investment adviser and their respective staffs, when and to the extent engaged in providing investment advisory and management services, and the compensation and routine overhead expenses of such personnel allocable to such services, are provided and paid for by Oxford Lane Management. We bear all other costs and expenses of our operations and transactions, including (without limitation):

• the cost of our organization and this offering;
• the cost of calculating our net asset value, including the cost of any third-party valuation services;
• the cost of effecting sales and repurchases of our shares and other securities;
• interest payable on debt, if any, to finance our investments;
• fees payable to third parties relating to, or associated with, making investments, including legal fees and expenses and fees and expenses associated with performing due diligence reviews of prospective investments and advisory fees as well as expenses associated with such activities;
• the costs associated with protecting our interests in our investments, including legal fees;
• transfer agent and custodial fees;
• fees and expenses associated with marketing and investor relations efforts;
• federal and state registration fees, any stock exchange listing fees;
• federal, state and local taxes;
• independent directors’ fees and expenses;
• brokerage commissions;
• fidelity bond, directors and officers errors and omissions liability insurance and other insurance premiums;
• direct costs and expenses of administration, including printing, mailing, long distance telephone and staff;
• fees and expenses associated with independent audits and outside legal costs;
• costs associated with our reporting and compliance obligations under the 1940 Act and applicable federal and state securities laws; and
• all other expenses incurred by either BDC Partners or us in connection with administering our business, including payments under the Administration Agreement that will be based upon our allocable portion of overhead and other expenses incurred by BDC Partners in performing its obligations under the Administration Agreement, including rent, the fees and expenses associated with performing compliance functions, and our allocable portion of the costs of compensation and related expenses of our Chief Compliance Officer, our Chief Financial Officer and any administrative support staff.

Duration and Termination

Unless earlier terminated as described below, the Investment Advisory Agreement will remain in effect if approved annually by our Board of Directors or by the affirmative vote of the holders of a majority of our outstanding voting securities, including, in either case, approval by a majority of our directors who are not parties to such agreement or who are not “interested persons” of any such party, as such term is defined in Section 2(a)(19) of the 1940 Act. The Investment Advisory Agreement will automatically terminate in the event of its assignment. The Investment Advisory Agreement may also be terminated by either party without penalty upon not more than 60 days’ written notice to the other party. See “Risk Factors — Risks Relating to Our Business and Structure — Our investment adviser can resign on 60 days’ notice.”

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Indemnification

The Investment Advisory Agreement provides that, absent willful misfeasance, bad faith or gross negligence in the performance of its duties or by reason of the reckless disregard of its duties and obligations, Oxford Lane Management and its officers, managers, partners, agents, employees, controlling persons, members and any other person or entity affiliated with it are entitled to indemnification from Oxford Lane Capital for any damages, liabilities, costs and expenses (including reasonable attorneys’ fees and amounts reasonably paid in settlement) arising from the rendering of Oxford Lane Management’s services under the Investment Advisory Agreement or otherwise as an investment adviser of Oxford Lane Capital.

Organization of the Investment Adviser

Oxford Lane Management is a Connecticut limited liability company that is registered as an investment adviser under the Advisers Act. BDC Partners, a Delaware limited liability company, is its managing member and provides Oxford Lane Management with all personnel necessary to manage our day-to-day operations and provide the services under the Investment Advisory Agreement. The principal address of Oxford Lane Management and of BDC Partners is 8 Sound Shore Drive, Suite 255, Greenwich, Connecticut 06830.

Charles M. Royce is a non-managing member of Oxford Lane Management. Mr. Royce has served as President since 1972, and a member of the Board of Managers since 2001, of Royce & Associates. He also manages or co-manages twelve of Royce & Associates’ open-and closed-end registered funds. Mr. Royce serves on the Board of Directors of The Royce Funds. Mr. Royce has served as Chairman of the Board of Directors of TICC Capital Corp. since 2003. Mr. Royce is a non-managing member of TICC Management, LLC, the investment adviser for TICC Capital Corp. Mr. Royce, as a non-managing member of Oxford Lane Management, does not take part in the management or participate in the operations of Oxford Lane Management; however, Mr. Royce may be available from time to time to Oxford Lane Management to provide certain consulting services without compensation. Royce & Associates is a wholly owned subsidiary of Legg Mason, Inc.

Board Approval of the Investment Advisory Agreement

A discussion regarding the basis for our board of director’s approval of our Investment Advisory Agreement will be included in our first annual or semi-annual report filed subsequent to completion of any such board action pertaining thereto.

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ADMINISTRATION AGREEMENT

BDC Partners, a Delaware limited liability company, serves as our administrator. The principal executive offices of BDC Partners are located at 8 Sound Shore Drive, Suite 255, Greenwich, CT 06830. Pursuant to an Administration Agreement, BDC Partners furnishes us with office facilities, equipment and clerical, bookkeeping and record keeping services at such facilities. Under the Administration Agreement, BDC Partners also performs, or oversees the performance of, our required administrative services, which include, among other things, being responsible for the financial records which we are required to maintain and preparing reports to our stockholders. In addition, BDC Partners assists us in determining and publishing our net asset value, oversees the preparation and filing of our tax returns and the printing and dissemination of reports to our stockholders, and generally oversees the payment of our expenses and the performance of administrative and professional services rendered to us by others. Payments under the Administration Agreement are equal to an amount based upon our allocable portion of BDC Partners’ overhead in performing its obligations under the Administration Agreement, including rent, the fees and expenses associated with performing compliance functions and our allocable portion of the compensation of our Chief Financial Officer and Chief Compliance Officer, our Treasurer and Controller, and other support personnel. The Administration Agreement may be terminated by either party without penalty upon 60 days’ written notice to the other party.

The Administration Agreement provides that, absent willful misfeasance, bad faith or negligence in the performance of its duties or by reason of the reckless disregard of its duties and obligations, BDC Partners and its officers, managers, partners, agents, employees, controlling persons, members and any other person or entity affiliated with it are entitled to indemnification from Oxford Lane Capital for any damages, liabilities, costs and expenses (including reasonable attorneys’ fees and amounts reasonably paid in settlement) arising from the rendering of BDC Partners’ services under the Administration Agreement or otherwise as administrator for Oxford Lane Capital.

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CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND TRANSACTIONS

We have entered into the Investment Advisory Agreement with Oxford Lane Management. Oxford Lane Management is controlled by BDC Partners, its managing member. In addition to BDC Partners, Oxford Lane Management is owned in part by Charles M. Royce as a non-managing member. BDC Partners, as the managing member of Oxford Lane Management, manages the business and internal affairs of Oxford Lane Management. In addition, BDC Partners provides us with office facilities and administrative services pursuant to the Administration Agreement. Jonathan H. Cohen, our Chief Executive Officer, as well as a director, is the managing member of and controls BDC Partners. Saul B. Rosenthal, our President, is also the President and Chief Operating Officer of TICC Management and a member of BDC Partners.

Charles M. Royce is President of Royce & Associates. Mr. Royce, as a non-managing member of Oxford Lane Management, does not take part in the management or participate in the operations of Oxford Lane Management; however, Mr. Royce may be available from time to time to Oxford Lane Management to provide certain consulting services without compensation. Royce & Associates is a wholly owned subsidiary of Legg Mason, Inc.

In addition, Mr. Cohen currently serves as Chief Executive Officer and Mr. Rosenthal currently serves as President and Chief Operating Officer of TICC Capital Corp., a publicly-traded business development company that invests principally in the debt of U.S.-based companies and is the collateral manager of TICC CLO LLC, and TICC CLO 2012-1 LLC, and TICC Capital Corp.’s investment adviser, TICC Management. Messrs. Cohen and Rosenthal also currently serve as Chief Executive Officer, and President, respectively, for T2 Advisers, LLC, which serves as collateral manager of T2 Income Fund CLO I Ltd. BDC Partners is the managing member of TICC Management, LLC and T2 Advisers, LLC, respectively. As a result, Messrs. Cohen and Rosenthal may be subject to certain conflicts of interests with respect to their management of our portfolio on the one hand, and their respective obligations to manage TICC Capital Corp., TICC CLO LLC, TICC CLO 2012-1 LLC and T2 Income Fund CLO I Ltd. on the other hand. In addition, Patrick F. Conroy, our Chief Financial Officer, Chief Compliance Officer and Corporate Secretary, currently serves in similar capacities for TICC Capital Corp. Mr. Conroy also currently serves as the Chief Financial Officer, Chief Compliance Officer and Treasurer of T2 Advisers, LLC, TICC Management and BDC Partners.

BDC Partners has adopted a written policy with respect to the allocation of investment opportunities among us, TICC Capital Corp. and T2 Income Fund CLO I Ltd. in view of the potential conflicts of interest raised by the relationships described above.

In the ordinary course of business, we may enter into transactions with portfolio companies that may be considered related party transactions. In order to ensure that we do not engage in any prohibited transactions with any persons affiliated with us, we have implemented certain policies and procedures whereby our executive officers screen each of our transactions for any possible affiliations between the proposed portfolio investment, us, companies controlled by us and our employees and directors. We will not enter into any agreements unless and until we are satisfied that doing so will not raise concerns under the 1940 Act or, if such concerns exist, we have taken appropriate actions to seek board review and approval or exemptive relief for such transaction. Our Board of Directors reviews these procedures on an annual basis.

We have also adopted a Code of Ethics which applies to, among others, our senior officers, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as well as every officer, director and employee of Oxford Lane Capital. Our Code of Ethics requires that all employees and directors avoid any conflict, or the appearance of a conflict, between an individual’s personal interests and the interests of Oxford Lane Capital. Pursuant to our Code of Ethics, each employee and director must disclose any conflicts of interest, or actions or relationships that might give rise to a conflict, to our Chief Compliance Officer. Our Audit Committee is charged with approving any waivers under our Code of Ethics. As required by the NASDAQ Stock Market corporate governance listing standards, the Audit Committee of our Board of Directors is also required to review and approve any transactions with related parties (as such term is defined in Item 404 of Regulation S-K).

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CONTROL PERSONS AND PRINCIPAL STOCKHOLDERS

The following table sets forth, as of June 5, 2014, certain information regarding the beneficial ownership of our common stock and preferred stock by each of our directors, executive officers, each person known to us to beneficially own 5% or more of the outstanding shares of our common stock or preferred stock, and the executive officers and directors as a group.

Beneficial ownership is determined in accordance with the rules of the SEC and includes voting or investment power with respect to the securities. Ownership information for those persons who beneficially own 5% or more of our shares of common stock or preferred stock is based upon Schedule 13G or 13D filings by such persons with the SEC and other information obtained from such persons, if available.

Unless otherwise indicated, the Company believes that each beneficial owner set forth in the table has sole voting and investment power and has the same address as the Company. Our address is 8 Sound Shore Drive, Suite 255, Greenwich, Connecticut 06830.

Name of Beneficial Owner Number of Shares of Common Stock Beneficially Owned (1) Percentage of Class of Common Stock (2) Number of Shares of Preferred Stock Beneficially Owned (1) Percentage of Class of Preferred
Stock (2)
Interested Directors
Jonathan H. Cohen 210,000 1.4 % 44,444 1.0 %
Saul B. Rosenthal 110,000 * 22,222 *
Independent Directors
Mark J. Ashenfelter 12,500 * — —
John Reardon — — — —
David S. Shin — — — —
Executive Officers
Patrick F. Conroy 35,000 * 10,000 *
Executive Officers and Directors as a Group 367,500